Trump asks aides about U.S. buying Greenland | TribLIVE.com
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Trump asks aides about U.S. buying Greenland

Associated Press
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AP
The town of Upernavik in western Greenland as seen July 11, 2015. Aiming to put his mark on the world map, President Donald Trump has talked to aides and allies about buying Greenland for the United States.
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AP
In this photo taken on Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2019, icebergs are photographed from the window of an airplane carrying NASA Scientists as they fly on a mission to track melting ice in eastern Greenland. Greenland has been melting faster in the last decade and this summer, it has seen two of the biggest melts on record since 2012.
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AP
A cross sits on the side of the road as fog covers homes in Kulusuk, Greenland, early Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019. Greenland has been melting faster in the past decade and this summer, it has seen two of the biggest melts on record since 2012.
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President Donald Trump speaks with reporters before boarding Air Force One at Morristown Municipal Airport in Morristown, N.J., Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019, en route to a campaign rally in Manchester, N.H.

WASHINGTON — Aiming to put his mark on the world map, President Donald Trump has talked to aides and allies about buying Greenland for the U.S.

A Trump ally told The Associated Press on Thursday that the Republican president had discussed the purchase but was not serious about it. And a Republican congressional aide said Trump brought up the notion of buying Greenland in conversations with lawmakers enough times to make them wonder, but they have not taken his comments seriously. Both spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss private conversations.

Anyway, Greenland said it’s not on the market.

“We have a good cooperation with USA, and we see it as an expression of greater interest in investing in our country and the possibilities we offer,” the island’s government said on its website. “Of course, Greenland is not for sale.”

Still, it wouldn’t be the first time an American leader tried to buy the world’s largest island, an autonomous territory of Denmark.

In 1946, the U.S. proposed to pay Denmark $100 million to buy Greenland after flirting with the idea of swapping land in Alaska for strategic parts of the Arctic island.

Neither the White House nor Denmark commented Thursday. Trump is set to visit Denmark next month.

The story was first reported by The Wall Street Journal.

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