Trump campaign threatens to sue Minneapolis over ‘phony’ security bill for rally | TribLIVE.com
Politics Election

Trump campaign threatens to sue Minneapolis over ‘phony’ security bill for rally

Associated Press
1780197_web1_AP19281631948744
AP
President Donald Trump, right, walks on the tarmac with the U.S. ambassador to European Union Gordon Sondland, left, during his arrival on Air Force One at Melsbroek Air Base, Tuesday, July 10, 2018 in Brussels, Belgium.

MINNEAPOLIS — President Donald Trump’s campaign attacked Minneapolis and its “radical leftist mayor” over an attempt to recover $530,000 in security costs for a rally in the liberal city, accusing the mayor of trying to sink the president’s event.

The campaign accused Mayor Jacob Frey — a Trump critic — of “conjuring a phony and outlandish bill for security” for Thursday’s rally that far exceeded that for a 2009 event in the same building by then-President Barack Obama.

The campaign said the city sent the estimate to Target Center’s operator, AEG Management, which threatened to cancel its contract to host the rally if the costs weren’t covered. Its law firm threatened to sue AEG if the rally doesn’t proceed.

Trump attacked Frey on Twitter on Tuesday, writing “Someone please tell the Radical Left Mayor of Minneapolis that he can’t price out Free Speech. Probably illegal!”

His campaign said the “bogus security charges” are an attempt to prevent Minneapolis residents from supporting Trump.

“The radical leftist mayor of Minneapolis, Jacob Frey, is abusing the power of his office and attempting to extort President Trump’s re-election campaign,” Trump’s campaign said in a statement.

The rally, Trump’s first since the House moved toward impeachment over his handling of a phone call with Ukraine’s president, is in a state Trump nearly won in 2016 and has talked frequently of capturing in 2020. But it takes place in a traditionally liberal city and the home turf of a frequent foil, Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar.

When the rally was announced last month, Frey said Trump’s “message of hatred” would never be welcome in Minnesota. But at a news conference Tuesday, he said the city will do all it can to guarantee a “safe and peaceful week,” regardless of his political differences with Trump.

Frey stood by the security costs estimate, saying a Trump political rally brings “significant expenses” not associated with Obama’s 2009 event, which was aimed at building support for health care reform. Frey said the Trump campaign’s complaint is with AEG.

Neither AEG nor the law firm for Trump’s campaign immediately responded to messages seeking comment.

Trump also attacked Frey over Twitter for a policy that prohibits city police officers from wearing their uniforms in support of candidates at political events or in campaign ads. The city’s police union spokesman has complained about the policy, and the union is selling “Cops for Trump” T-shirts.

Frey said the police force must be nonpartisan and non-ideological.

“They’re free to express their First Amendment rights but should do so off-duty,” he said.

Categories: News | Politics Election
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.