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Trump defends ‘Tim Apple’ comment, says he was saving time | TribLIVE.com
Politics/Election

Trump defends ‘Tim Apple’ comment, says he was saving time

Associated Press
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AP
FILE - In this Wednesday, March 6, 2019 file photo, President Donald Trump talks to Apple Inc. CEO Tim Cook during the American Workforce Policy Advisory Board’s first meeting in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington. To President Donald Trump, it was an awkward slip of the lip. To Apple CEO Tim Cook, it was an opportunity to poke some lighthearted fun at a president who has often clashed with the tech industry. A day after Trump mistakenly referred to Cook at a Wednesday White House meeting as “Tim Apple” — an understandable slip, perhaps, coming from the head of the Trump Organization — Cook quietly changed his Twitter account, replacing his last name with the Apple logo.
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AP
President Donald Trump flanked by American Workforce Policy Advisory Board co-chair Ivanka Trump and Apple Inc. CEO Tim Cook, speaks during the advisory board’s first meeting in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, March 6, 2019.
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AP
President Donald Trump acknowledges Apple Inc. CEO Tim Cook during the American Workforce Policy Advisory Board’s first meeting in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, March 6, 2019.
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AP
American Workforce Policy Advisory Board co-chair Ivanka Trump, right, and Apple Inc. CEO Tim Cook, left, react as President Donald Trump thank his daughter during the advisory board’s first meeting in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, March 6, 2019.

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump says he didn’t slip up when he referred to Apple CEO Tim Cook as “Tim Apple” at a White House meeting.

Trump tweeted Monday: “I quickly referred to Tim + Apple as Tim/Apple as an easy way to save time & words. The Fake News was disparagingly all over this, & it became yet another bad Trump story!”’

Trump made the comment last week. After the session, Cook altered his Twitter profile, replacing his last name with the Apple logo.

At a dinner for Republican National Committee donors at his Florida club Friday, Trump complained that his “Tim Apple” flub was “fake news,” said a person who heard them and spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss Trump’s remarks. Trump’s complaint was first reported by Axios.

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