Trump, Republican party sue over California tax return law | TribLIVE.com
Politics Election

Trump, Republican party sue over California tax return law

Associated Press
1507968_web1_1507968-3360cc28ba2a40ada08ab351989944a1
AP
In this July 23, 2019 file photo is California Gov. Gavin Newsom during a news conference in Sacramento, Calif. The Trump campaign and Republican Party have sued California over a new law requiring presidential candidates to release their tax returns. Newsom, who signed the law last week has been named as a defendant in one of the two lawsuits, filed Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2019. The suits argue the law is unconstitutional.
1507968_web1_1507968-56a52972f9ae4c1188dda668517770a2
AP
In this Sept. 5, 2017 file photo is California Secretary of State Alex Padilla during a news conference in Sacramento, Calif. The Trump campaign and Republican Party have sued California over a new law requiring presidential candidates to release their tax returns. Padilla, been named as a defendant in the two lawsuits, filed Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2019. The suits argue the law is unconstitutional.
1507968_web1_1507968-1156bb9938ef4987ba8a8b5d2e82e9a2
AP
In this Aug. 30, 2018, file photo, Assemblywoman Melissa Melendez, R-Lake Elsinore, speaks on a measure before the Assembly, in Sacramento, Calif. Melendez is named as a plaintiff in a lawsuit against California over a new law requiring presidential candidates to release their tax returns. Two lawsuits, filed Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2019, argue the law is unconstitutional.,

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — The Trump campaign and Republican Party sued California on Tuesday over a new law requiring presidential candidates to release their tax returns to run in the state’s primary, legislation that was aimed at prying loose President Trump’s returns.

California’s law is “a naked political attack against the sitting President of the United States,” the state and national Republican parties argued in one of two lawsuits filed in U.S. District Court in Sacramento.

The law signed last week by Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom requires candidates for president and governor to release five years of tax returns to appear on the state’s primary ballot, but the requirement does not extend to the general election. Trump has refused to release his returns, saying they are under audit.

The lawsuits argue the law violates the U.S. Constitution by creating an extra requirement to run for president and deprives citizens the right to vote for their chosen candidates. The Constitution puts just three requirements on presidential candidates: That they are natural born citizens, 35 or older and a U.S. resident for at least 14 years.

California is the first state to pass such a law, though many others under Democratic control have tried since Trump left office.

California holds its 2020 presidential primary on March 3. Without a serious Republican competitor, Trump would likely be able to forego the state’s primary and still win the nomination.

But the parties’ lawsuit argues it will “directly impede” Trump’s ability to secure the nomination. California provides 14% of the delegates needed to win the party’s nomination, the suit says.

Trump counsel Jay Sekulow called the law “flagrantly illegal,” and said voters already spoke in 2016 on whether Trump should release his tax returns.

“The effort to deny California voters the opportunity to cast a ballot for President Trump in 2020 will clearly fail,” Sekulow said in a statement.

It’s the latest legal battle between the Trump administration and California, which has sued the federal government more than 50 times since Trump took office.

Tax returns reveal sources of income, charitable giving, business dealings and other information that Democrats in the state Legislature say is essential for voters. Every president has released his or her tax returns since the early 1970s.

“There’s an easy fix Mr. President — release your returns as you promised during the campaign and follow the precedent of every president since 1973,” Newsom tweeted.

The Trump campaign, meanwhile, argued in its suit that Democrats are “on a crusade to obtain the President’s federal tax returns in the hopes of finding something they can use to harm him politically.”

Republicans also say keeping Trump off the ballot could depress voter turnout in the primary, hurting Republicans in other races down ticket, such as for the state Legislature. That could hurt the party’s chances of being in the general election in some races, given California’s top-two primary system that sends the two highest vote getters in the primary to the general election regardless of party.

The U.S. Supreme court has previously halted state efforts to add ballot access rules for congressional candidates. Former Gov. Jerry Brown, also a Democrat, vetoed a similar law two years ago, arguing it would create a slippery slope of trying to force candidates to release additional information to run for president.

At least two other lawsuits have already been filed.

Categories: News | Politics Election
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.