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Trump’s threat to go to court on impeachment defies ruling

Associated Press
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In this April 21, 2019 photo, President Donald Trump walks across the tarmac during his arrival on Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base, Md.

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump said Wednesday he’ll go directly to the U.S. Supreme Court “if the partisan Dems” ever try to impeach him.

But Trump’s strategy could run into a roadblock: the high court itself, which said in 1993 that the framers of the Constitution didn’t intend for the courts to have the power to review impeachment proceedings. The Supreme Court ruled that impeachment and removal from office is Congress’ duty alone.

“I DID NOTHING WRONG,” Trump tweeted. He said not only are there no “High Crimes and Misdemeanors,” one of the bases for impeachment outlined in the U.S. Constitution, “there are no Crimes by me at all.”

He alleged Democrats committed crimes and said they’re looking “to Congress as last hope!” because “We waited for Mueller and WON.” That was a reference to special counsel Robert Mueller’s report into Russian meddling in the 2016 election.

The Mueller report, released last week, revealed that Trump tried to seize control of the Russia investigation.

Trump’s threat to “head to the U.S. Supreme Court” would seem to face an uphill battle. In his 1993 opinion, Chief Justice William Rehnquist wrote that a federal judge’s appeal of his impeachment was not reviewable by courts. He said the framers of the Constitution “did not intend for the courts to have the power to review impeachment proceedings.”

If the courts were allowed to review impeachments, Rehnquist wrote, it could plunge the country into “months, or perhaps years, of chaos.”

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has urged divided Democrats to focus on fact-finding rather than the prospect of any impeachment proceedings after the damning details of Mueller’s report.

Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, who subpoenaed former White House counsel Don McGahn , said this week in a statement that Mueller’s report, even in redacted form, “outlines substantial evidence that President Trump engaged in obstruction and other abuses.”

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