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Greensburg board approves facade makeover for East Pittsburgh Street building

Jacob Tierney
| Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2016, 11:00 p.m.
Greensburg Historical and Architectural Review Board Tuesday recommended a plan for a new facade for this building at 212 East Pittsburgh Street, formerly Woods and Water.
Submitted
Greensburg Historical and Architectural Review Board Tuesday recommended a plan for a new facade for this building at 212 East Pittsburgh Street, formerly Woods and Water.
A computer rendering showing the proposed facade for 212 E. Pittsburgh St. in Greensburg. Work is expected to begin next month, pending city council approval.
Submitted
A computer rendering showing the proposed facade for 212 E. Pittsburgh St. in Greensburg. Work is expected to begin next month, pending city council approval.

A former furniture and pool supply store on East Pittsburgh Street in Greensburg has received preliminary approval to get a facelift.

Owner John Harris and architect Lee Calisti pitched the plan for the aging building to Greensburg's Historical and Architectural Review Board this week.

Calisti is a member of the board and abstained from the vote. The other members unanimously agreed to recommend the plan to city council.

The building has been vacant since December, when longstanding furniture store Woods and Water — formerly the David Flamm Co. — closed. Harris purchased the building for $165,000, according to Westmoreland County property records.

A bike shop is renting the first floor.

Harris plans to renovate the upper floor to house retail businesses. He said he will begin searching for tenants soon.

The 5,600-square-foot space could house one or two tenants, Harris said.

Calisti said the nondescript brick building is a “nice blank canvas” on which to create a distinctive look.

A computer-generated rendering of his plans show a metal-and-glass facade that Calisti said is meant to draw attention to the businesses it houses.

“What we need to do is visually anchor that corner, because it is so prominent to those who are familiar with that corner in Greensburg,” he said.

Demolition of the interior of the building has been completed, according to Harris. Work on the facade will begin as soon as possible after receiving council approval, he said.

Harris owns The Stereo Shop across the street on East Pittsburgh Street and several other Greensburg properties.

Review board member Lynn Armbrust owns Greensburg Art Supply, near Harris' properties on East Pittsburgh Street. She said she hopes the new design sparks development in a part of the city that hasn't experienced much.

“I think it's a great trend to start, and I think it's just contagious,” she said.

Jacob Tierney is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-836-6646 or jtierney@tribweb.com.

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