ShareThis Page
Where pro- and anti-Brexit forces collide | TribLIVE.com
Daily Gallery

Where pro- and anti-Brexit forces collide

Associated Press
789271_web1_gtr-Brexit14
AP
Leave the European Union supporter Joseph Afrane, aged 55 from London and originally from Ghana, poses for photographs outside the Houses of Parliament in London, Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019. Joseph believes leaving the European Union with no-deal would be the best way forward and believes Britain has been neglecting its relationship with the Commonwealth since joining the EU. The colorful debate over Britain’s Brexit split with the European Union has spilled over from Parliament to the grounds outside, traditionally a marketplace for ideas, protests and rallies.(AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
789271_web1_gtr-Brexit11
AP
Leave the European Union supporter Belinda Delucy, aged 42 from London, poses for photographs backdropped by the Houses of Parliament in London, Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019. Belinda believes leaving the EU with no-deal and then the EU making Britain a better offer after Brexit would the best way forward. Some demonstrators have been coming to the grounds outside parliament for days, weeks or even months, to make their case as to whether Britain should stay inside the European Union or leave on March 29, as planned.(AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
789271_web1_gtr-Brexit12
AP
Leave the European Union supporter Eleanor Dobson, aged 54 from Cambridge, poses for photographs backdropped by the Houses of Parliament in London, Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2019. Eleanor believes leaving the European Union with a clean break would be the best way forward. With Brexit only days away, it is in the grounds outside parliament that the true believers gather each day to try to influence lawmakers, call attention to their cause, and bring new supporters into the fold. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
789271_web1_gtr-Brexit09
AP
Leave the European Union supporter Michelle Megan from Newbury and originally from Dublin, Ireland, poses for photographs opposite the Houses of Parliament in London, Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019. Michelle believes leaving the EU properly, not with British Prime Minister Theresa’s May deal would the best way forward. She would also like Ireland to "Irexit" from the European Union. With Brexit only days away, it is in the grounds outside parliament that the true believers gather each day to try to influence lawmakers, call attention to their cause, and bring new supporters into the fold.(AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
789271_web1_gtr-Brexit10
AP
A leave the European Union supporter who didn’t want to give his name poses for photographs outside the Houses of Parliament in London, Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019. This demonstrator believes leaving the European Union for Britain to make its own laws would the best way forward. Some demonstrators have been coming to the grounds outside parliament for days, weeks or even months, to make their case as to whether Britain should stay inside the European Union or leave on March 29, as planned. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
789271_web1_gtr-Brexit15
AP
Leave the European Union supporter Max, aged 21 from London, poses for photographs outside the Houses of Parliament in London, Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2019. Max believes leaving the European Union as soon as possible would be the best way forward. The colorful debate over Britain’s Brexit split with the European Union has spilled over from Parliament to the grounds outside, traditionally a marketplace for ideas, protests and rallies.(AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
789271_web1_gtr-Brexit13
AP
Leave the European Union supporter Patricia Sharman, aged 62 from Hampshire, poses for photographs opposite the Houses of Parliament in London, Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019. Patricia believes leaving the European Union with a clean break would be the best way forward. The colorful debate over Britain’s Brexit split with the European Union has spilled over from Parliament to the grounds outside, traditionally a marketplace for ideas, protests and rallies. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
789271_web1_gtr-Brexit08
AP
Remain in the European Union supporter Kate Willoughby, from Yorkshire and dressed as early 20th century suffragette Emily Davison, poses for photographs backdropped by a statue at right of suffragist Millicent Fawcett on Parliament Square opposite the Houses of Parliament in London, Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019. Kate believes putting another referendum back to the people of Britain that is free and fair, as much has changed since the 2016 referendum, would be the best way forward. With Brexit only days away, it is in the grounds outside parliament that the true believers gather each day to try to influence lawmakers, call attention to their cause, and bring new supporters into the fold.(AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
789271_web1_gtr-Brexit06
AP
Remain in the European Union supporter Kaya Mar, aged 63 from London and originally from Spain, poses for photographs with one of his paintings that was so new the paint wasn’t dry, outside the Houses of Parliament in London, Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019. Kaya believes Brexit is economic suicide and a leave deal that keeps free movement and the economy as it is would be the best way forward. The colorful debate over Britain’s Brexit split with the European Union has spilled over from Parliament to the grounds outside, traditionally a marketplace for ideas, protests and rallies.(AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
789271_web1_gtr-Brexit03
AP
Remain in the European Union supporter Steve Bray, aged 49 from Port Talbot in Wales and who has been protesting for 18-months outside the Houses of Parliament, poses for photographs backdropped by the Houses of Parliament in London, Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019. Steve believes "Article 50" being revoked, meaning Britain staying in the European Union would be the best way forward. Some demonstrators have been coming to the grounds outside parliament for days, weeks or even months, to make their case as to whether Britain should stay inside the European Union or leave on March 29, as planned. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
789271_web1_gtr-Brexit04
AP
Remain in the European Union supporter Charlie Rome, aged 35 from London and dressed as British pro-Brexit politician Jacob Rees-Mogg poses for photographs outside the Houses of Parliament in London, Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019. Charlie believes a public inquiry looking at campaign overspending, breaking data protection rules and possible foreign funding of the Vote Leave campaign and having another referendum would be the best way forward. Some demonstrators have been coming to the grounds outside parliament for days, weeks or even months, to make their case as to whether Britain should stay inside the European Union or leave on March 29, as planned.(AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
789271_web1_gtr-Brexit02
AP
Remain in the European Union supporter Madeleina Kay, aged 24 from Sheffield, poses for photographs opposite the Houses of Parliament in London, Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019. Madeleina believes stopping Brexit, having another referendum where everyone abides by the law and educating people on the role the EU plays in Britain would be the best way forward. Britain voted to leave Europe in a referendum more than two years ago, but Parliament has been unable to agree on a withdrawal arrangement, prompting some calls for a delay or even a cancellation of the split. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
789271_web1_gtr-Brexit05
AP
Lara Spirit, aged 22 from Chichester, a remain in the European Union supporter and member of the "Our Future, Our Choice" (OFOC) young people against Brexit organisation campaigning for a People’s Vote second referendum on Britain’s EU membership, poses for photographs after taking part in a protest against a blindfold Brexit on Parliament Square opposite the Houses of Parliament in London, Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019. Lara believes a People’s Vote second referendum would be the best way forward. Britain voted to leave Europe in a referendum more than two years ago, but Parliament has been unable to agree on a withdrawal arrangement, prompting some calls for a delay or even a cancellation of the split. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
789271_web1_gtr-Brexit07
AP
Remain in the European Union supporter Juliet Mills, aged 67 from London, poses for photographs backdropped by the Houses of Parliament in London, Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019. Juliet believes not going ahead with Brexit and remaining in the European Union would be the best way forward. With Brexit only days away, it is in the grounds outside parliament that the true believers gather each day to try to influence lawmakers, call attention to their cause, and bring new supporters into the fold. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

LONDON (AP) — Few issues in recent years have generated the passion in Britain that the Brexit situation has, and the colorful debate has spilled over from Parliament to the grounds outside, traditionally a marketplace for ideas, protests and rallies.

It is here that the true believers gather each day to try to influence lawmakers, call attention to their cause, and bring new supporters into the fold. Some have been coming for weeks and months to make their case as to whether Britain should stay inside the European Union or leave on March 29, as planned.

Britain voted to leave in a referendum more than two years ago, and the date of Britain’s departure has been set, but Parliament has been unable to agree on a withdrawal arrangement agreed to by Prime Minister Theresa May in two years of talks with EU counterparts.

That’s led to doubts about whether Britain will be ready to leave the EU next month, prompting some calls for a delay or even a cancellation of the split. Emotions are running high as momentous decisions near.

Categories: News | Daily Gallery
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.