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Levi Strauss plans to raise $100M in initial public offering | TribLIVE.com
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Levi Strauss plans to raise $100M in initial public offering

The Associated Press
| Wednesday, February 13, 2019 11:58 a.m
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AP Photo
In this Feb. 9, 2018 photo Bart Sights, head of the Eureka Lab, compares the markings and damage on jeans that he guesses are close to 30 years old, left, to jeans made within a few hours of this photograph at Levi’s innovation lab in San Francisco. Well-known jeans company Levi Strauss & Co. said Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2019, that it plans to raise about $100 million through an initial public offering. The number of shares to be offered and the price range has yet to be determined. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
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AP Photo
This Feb. 9, 2018 photo shows workers at Levi’s innovation lab in San Francisco. Well-known jeans company Levi Strauss & Co. said Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2019, that it plans to raise about $100 million through an initial public offering. The number of shares to be offered and the price range has yet to be determined. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
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AP Photo
This Feb. 9, 2018 photo shows Levi’s jeans hanging on a wall at Levi’s innovation lab in San Francisco. Well-known jeans company Levi Strauss & Co. said Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2019, that it plans to raise about $100 million through an initial public offering. The number of shares to be offered and the price range has yet to be determined. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)

SAN FRANCISCO — Well-known jeans company Levi Strauss & Co. says it plans to raise about $100 million through an initial public offering.

The number of shares to be offered and the price range has yet to be determined. The total amount raised may change based on investor demand and other factors.

The San Francisco-based company said Wednesday that it plans to use the proceeds from the IPO for general corporate purposes, including working capital, operating expenses and capital expenditures. It may also use proceeds for acquisitions or other strategic investments.

Levi Strauss made its first pair of jeans in 1873. It was a public company from 1971 until 1985 when it was taken private in a leveraged buyout.

In its fiscal year ended last November, revenue rose nearly 14 percent to $5.58 billion. The company earned $283.1 million, or 73 cents per share.

The shares will be listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the “LEVI” ticker symbol.

Categories: Business | Wire stories
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