Public’s help sought after 7 bikers die in crash with pickup | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World

Public’s help sought after 7 bikers die in crash with pickup

Associated Press
1326776_web1_1326776-107ff1d3c75b433a9377c1db3cd2cf24
Miranda Thompson via AP
This photo provided by Miranda Thompson shows the scene where several motorcycles and a pickup truck collided on a rural, two-lane highway Friday, June 21, 2019 in Randolph, N.H. New Hampshire State Police said a 2016 Dodge 2500 pickup truck collided with the riders on U.S. 2 Friday evening. The cause of the deadly collision is not yet known. The pickup truck was on fire when emergency crews arrived.
1326776_web1_1326776-120d21de15f041dc860668bad05dbb0f
Miranda Thompson via AP
This photo provided by Miranda Thompson shows a man talking on his cellphone at the scene where several motorcycles and a pickup truck collided on a rural, two-lane highway Friday, June 21, 2019 in Randolph, N.H. New Hampshire State Police said a 2016 Dodge 2500 pickup truck collided with the riders on U.S. 2 Friday evening. The cause of the deadly collision is not yet known. The pickup truck was on fire when emergency crews arrived.
1326776_web1_1326776-7d03b6c48c064aa59c1ca875e64d59c5
Miranda Thompson via AP
This photo provided by Miranda Thompson shows the scene where several motorcycles and a pickup truck collided on a rural, two-lane highway Friday, June 21, 2019 in Randolph, N.H. New Hampshire State Police said a 2016 Dodge 2500 pickup truck collided with the riders on U.S. 2 Friday evening. The cause of the deadly collision is not yet known. The pickup truck was on fire when emergency crews arrived.

LANCASTER, N.H. — Investigators issued a plea Saturday for the public to come forward with information as they try to determine what caused a pickup truck hauling a trailer to collide with a group of 10 motorcycles on a rural highway, killing seven bikers and leaving their community reeling.

Authorities identified the pickup driver as Volodoymyr Zhukovskyy, 23, an employee of a Springfield, Massachusetts, company called Westfield Transport.

Zhukovskyy survived the accident and has not been charged, authorities said, but they didn’t release details on his condition or his whereabouts. A phone listing for him couldn’t be found.

Someone who answered the phone at a listing for Westfield Transport on Saturday and declined to give a name said the company is cooperating with the investigation.

The National Transportation Safety Board is among the agencies investigating. Authorities said they’re asking for the public’s help in the form of videos, photos or other information about the accident or the vehicles involved.

“This is one of the worst tragic incidents that we have investigated here in the state,” New Hampshire State Police Col. Chris Wagner said at a Saturday news conference in Lancaster. “It’s going to be a very lengthy investigation.”

A 2016 Dodge 2500 pickup truck towing a flatbed trailer of the kind used to haul cars collided with the riders around 6:30 p.m. Friday on U.S. 2, a two-lane highway in nearby Randolph, police said. Randolph is about a two-hour drive north of Concord, the capital, and a three-hour drive from Boston.

Along with the seven dead, state police said three additional people were taken to hospitals. Two of them were released Saturday. Police did not provide names.

The crash sent shockwaves through New England’s community of motorcycle enthusiasts and military veterans, which sometimes overlap. The crash involved members of Marine JarHeads MC, a motorcycle club in New England that includes Marines and their spouses.

“When something like this happens, we all feel it,” said Cat Wilson, who organizes a motorcycle charity event in Massachusetts and is a friend of some of the crash victims. “There is no tighter community than our biker community.”

The road reopened Saturday, and skid marks were still visible on the road, which has mountains and fields as a backdrop. A patch of burned grass remained.

Bill Brown, a 73-year-old military veteran and motorcyclist, arrived at the scene near a gentle curve in the road to plant flags, calling the victims “brothers in arms” and vowing to keep riding.

Members of the motorcycle community are already organizing help for the victims’ families, Wilson said. A memorial in nearby Berlin was planned for Saturday evening.

The pickup truck was on fire when emergency crews arrived. Witnesses described a “devastating” scene as bystanders tried to help riders lying in the road.

A photo posted by WMUR-TV showed motorcycles and wreckage scattered across the highway and a truck on the shoulder in flames.

The crash created a chaotic scene in the town of about 300 people.

“There was debris everywhere,” said Miranda Thompson, 21, of Manchester, who was several cars back and recalled seeing a truck in flames on the side of the highway and six motorcycles.

“People were in the grass,” she said. “There were people putting tourniquets on people, trying to make sure they didn’t move.”

Categories: News | Top Stories | World
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.