Aerial videos, photos show Hurricane Dorian’s destruction in Bahamas | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World

Aerial videos, photos show Hurricane Dorian’s destruction in Bahamas

Associated Press
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AFP/U.S. Coast Guard/Petty Officer 2nd Class Adam Stanton
In this aerial image courtesy of U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Clearwater, structures are damaged near the Marsh Harbour Clinic on Sept. 3, 2019, after the passage of Hurricane Dorian.
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AFP/U.S. Coast Guard
In this aerial image courtesy of U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Clearwater, structures are damaged near the Marsh Harbour Clinic on Sept. 3, 2019, after the passage of Hurricane Dorian.
1626991_web1_AFP_1K03UW
AFP/U.S. Coast Guard/Petty Officer 2nd Class Adam Stanton
In this aerial image courtesy of U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Clearwater, structures are damaged near the Marsh Harbour Clinic on Sept. 3, 2019, after the passage of Hurricane Dorian.
1626991_web1_AFP_1K03UV
AFP/U.S. Coast Guard/Petty Officer 2nd Class Adam Stanton
In this aerial image courtesy of U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Clearwater, structures are damaged near the Marsh Harbour Clinic on Sept. 3, 2019, after the passage of Hurricane Dorian.
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Medic Corps via AP
This aerial photo provided by Medic Corps shows the destruction brought by Hurricane Dorian on Man-o-War Cay, Bahamas, on Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2019.
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AP
Rain brought on by Hurricane Dorian continues to pour in Freeport, Bahamas, Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2019.
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U.S. Coast Guard Station Clearwater via AP
In this Monday, Sept. 2, 2019 photo released by the U.S. Coast Guard Station Clearwater, boats litter the area around marina in the Bahamas after they were tossed around by Hurricane Dorian.
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U.S. Coast Guard Station Clearwater via AP
This Monday, Sept. 2, 2019 photo released by the U.S. Coast Guard Station Clearwater shows flooding on the runway of the Marsh Harbour Airport in the Bahamas.

FREEPORT, Bahamas — Bahamians rescued victims of Hurricane Dorian with jet skis and a bulldozer as the U.S. Coast Guard, Britain’s Royal Navy and a handful of aid groups tried to get food and medicine to survivors and take the most desperate people to safety.

Airports were flooded and roads impassable after the most powerful storm to hit the Bahamas in recorded history parked over Abaco and Grand Bahama islands, pounding them with winds up to 185 mph and torrential rain before finally moving into open waters Tuesday.

At least seven deaths were reported in the Bahamas, with the full scope of the disaster still unknown.

The storm’s punishing winds and muddy brown floodwaters destroyed or severely damaged thousands of homes, crippled hospitals and trapped people in attics.

“It’s total devastation. It’s decimated. Apocalyptic,” said Lia Head-Rigby, who helps run a local hurricane relief group and flew over the Bahamas’ hard-hit Abaco Islands. “It’s not rebuilding something that was there; we have to start again.”

She said her representative on Abaco told her there were “a lot more dead,” though she had no numbers as bodies were being gathered.

The Bahamas’ prime minister also expected more deaths and predicted that rebuilding would require “a massive, coordinated effort.”

“We are in the midst of one of the greatest national crises in our country’s history,” Prime Minister Hubert Minnis said at a news conference. “No effort or resources will be held back.”

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