Amid protest, Hawaii astronomers lose observation time | TribLIVE.com
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Amid protest, Hawaii astronomers lose observation time

Associated Press
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FILE - In this July 14, 2019, file photo, a telescope at the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii’s tallest mountain is viewed. Astronomers across 11 observatories on Hawaii’s tallest mountain have cancelled more than 2,000 hours of telescope viewing over the past four weeks because a protest blocked a road to the summit. Astronomers said Friday, Aug. 9, 2019, they will attempt to resume observations but in some cases won’t be able to make up the missed research.
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FILE - In this July 19, 2019, file photo, protesters continue their opposition vigil against the construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope at Mauna Kea on the Big Island of Hawaii. Astronomers across 11 observatories on Hawaii’s tallest mountain have cancelled more than 2,000 hours of telescope viewing over the past four weeks because a protest blocked a road to the summit. Astronomers said Friday, Aug. 9, they will attempt to resume observations but in some cases won’t be able to make up the missed research.
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FILE - This Jan. 6, 2009, file photo shows astronomy observatories atop Mauna Kea, a dormant volcano on Hawaii’s Big Island where some Native Hawaiians have been peacefully protesting the construction of what would be one of the world’s largest telescopes. Astronomers across 11 observatories on Hawaii’s tallest mountain have cancelled more than 2,000 hours of telescope viewing over the past four weeks because the protest blocked a road to the summit. Astronomers said Friday, Aug. 9, 2019, they will attempt to resume observations but in some cases won’t be able to make up the missed research.
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FILE - In this July 23, 2019, file photo, Hawaii governor David Ige, right, watches a kahiko hula performance during a visit to the ninth day of protests against the Thirty Meter Telescope at the base of Mauna Kea on Hawaii Island. Astronomers across 11 observatories on Hawaii’s tallest mountain have cancelled more than 2,000 hours of telescope viewing over the past four weeks because a protest blocked a road to the summit.
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FILE - In this July 21, 2019, file photo provided by the Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources, protesters block a road to the summit of Mauna Kea in Hawaii. Astronomers across 11 observatories on Hawaii’s tallest mountain have cancelled more than 2,000 hours of telescope viewing over the past four weeks because a protest blocked a road to the summit. Astronomers said Friday, Aug. 9, they will attempt to resume observations but in some cases won’t be able to make up the missed research.
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FILE - In this Aug. 31, 2015, file photo, from bottom left, the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory, the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and the Submillimeter Array, far right, are shown on Hawaii’s Mauna Kea near Hilo, Hawaii. Astronomers across 11 observatories on Hawaii’s tallest mountain have cancelled more than 2,000 hours of telescope viewing over the past four weeks because a protest blocked a road to the summit. Mauna Kea is one of the world’s premier sites for studying the skies.

Astronomers across 11 observatories on Hawaii’s tallest mountain have cancelled more than 2,000 hours of telescope viewing over the past four weeks because a protest blocked a road to the summit.

The lost research atop Mauna Kea includes work on clouds of gas and dust on the verge of forming stars, and asteroids that might come close or even hit Earth.

Mauna Kea is one of the world’s premier sites for studying the skies.

Native Hawaiian protesters are blocking the road to prevent the construction of another telescope, which they fear will further harm a peak they consider sacred.

Astronomers said Friday they will attempt to resume observations but in some cases won’t be able to make up the missed research. Protesters say they shouldn’t be blamed for the shutdown.

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