AP Photos: Nepal woman spends her day feeding temple monkeys | TribLIVE.com
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AP Photos: Nepal woman spends her day feeding temple monkeys

Associated Press
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AP
In this July 8, 2019, photo, a monkey pulls on the clothes of Saraswati Dangol as she arrives to feed monkeys in the forest near Pashupatinath temple in Kathmandu, Nepal. For the past four years, Dangol has been bringing the bread every day to feed the monkeys. As soon as they see her with her white sack, they gather around her, some patiently waiting for their turn while others less patiently snatching the bread from her hands. Many of Dangol’s regulars are elderly, or are mother or baby monkeys who are unable to fight for their share of food in the wild.
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AP
In this July 5, 2019, photo, Saraswati Dangol feeds monkeys in the forest near Pashupatinath temple in Kathmandu, Nepal. For the past four years, Dangol has been bringing the bread every day to feed the monkeys. As soon as they see her with her white sack, they gather around her, some patiently waiting for their turn while others less patiently snatching the bread from her hands.
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AP
In this July 5, 2019, photo, Saraswati Dangol wraps rotisserie, or flat bread, after preparing them for monkeys near Pashupatinath temple in Kathmandu, Nepal. For the past four years, Dangol has been bringing the bread every day to feed some 300 monkeys. She buys some 10 kilograms (22 pounds) of flour and spends hours cooking the roti, traveling to the forest temple and feeding them daily.
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AP
In this July 8, 2019, photo, monkeys eat rotis, or flat bread, distributed by Saraswati Dangol in the forest near Pashupatinath temple in Kathmandu, Nepal. For the past four years, Dangol has been bringing the bread every day to feed the monkeys. As soon as they see her with her white sack, they gather around her, some patiently waiting for their turn while others less patiently snatching the bread from her hands. Many of Dangol’s regulars are elderly, or are mother or baby monkeys who are unable to fight for their share of food in the wild.
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AP
In this July 10, 2019, photo, a monkey drinks water from the Bagmati river near Pashupatinath temple in Kathmandu, Nepal. Thousands of monkeys live in the forest around the temple. Lately the monkeys from Pashupati have been wandering further away from the temple and forest area in search of food. The temple is revered by Hindus and draws pilgrims come from all over the world. The monkeys are a key feature of the temple area.
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AP
In this July 5, 2019, photo, a monkey eats roti, or flat bread, distributed by Saraswati Dangol in the forest near Pashupatinath temple in Kathmandu, Nepal. For the past four years, Dangol has been bringing the bread every day to feed the monkeys. “It used to be that the monkeys were able to feed on the fruits from the trees but now the forests are thin and hardly any fruits. They are going hungry and some of them even go to nearby houses to steal food,” she said, adding that the monkeys are injured by people whose homes they try to enter. As soon as they see her with her white sack, they gather around her, some patiently waiting for their turn while others less patiently snatching the bread from her hands.

KATHMANDU, Nepal — In the forests of Nepal’s capital Kathmandu near the revered Hindu temple of Pahsupatinath, some 300 monkeys eagerly await their pieces of roti, or flat bread.

For the past four years, Saraswati Dangol has been bringing the bread every day to feed the monkeys. She buys some 10 kilograms (22 pounds) of flour and spends hours cooking the roti, traveling to the forest temple and feeding them.

Thousands of monkeys live around the temple and about 300 of them come for Dongol’s roti.

As soon as they see her with her white sack, they gather around her, some patiently waiting for their turn while others less patiently snatching the bread from her hands.

“It used to be that the monkeys were able to feed on the fruits from the trees but now the forests are thin and hardly any fruit,” she said.

“They are going hungry and some of them even go to nearby houses to steal food,” she said, adding that the monkeys are injured by people whose homes they try to enter.

Lately the monkeys from Pashupati have been wandering farther away from the temple and forest area in search of food.

Many of Dangol’s regulars are elderly, or mother or baby monkeys that are unable to fight for their share of food in the wild.

Dangol rarely misses a day at the temple, but when she does, she struggles not to worry about the monkeys.

“When I miss a single day, I feel like I have not fed my kids and I become depressed,” she said.

The temple is revered by Hindus and draws pilgrims come from all over the world.

The monkeys are a key feature of the temple area. Visitors sometimes feed them, but the monkeys more often help themselves to the fruit and sweets left as temple offerings for the Hindu god Shiva.

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