Arctic fox walks more than 2,700 miles from Norway to Canada | TribLIVE.com
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Arctic fox walks more than 2,700 miles from Norway to Canada

Associated Press
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AP
A polar fox is fitted with a satellite tracking collar in Krossfjorden, Svalbard, a Norwegian Arctic archipelago, on July 29, 2017, as part of research conducted by the Norwegian Polar Institute. Norwegian researchers said Tuesday July 2, 2019, that this young female arctic fox, shown in this photo, has been tracked walking from northern Norway to Canada’s far north, a distance of 2,737 miles, via Greenland in 76 days.

COPENHAGEN, Denmark — Norwegian researchers say an arctic fox walked from northern Norway to Canada’s far north, a distance of 2,737 miles, in four months.

The Norwegian Polar Institute says the young female fox left her birthplace on Norway’s Svalbard archipelago on March 1, 2018 and reached Canada’s Ellesmere Island by way of Greenland on July 1, 2018.

The institute says the ground the small animal covered was among the most ever recorded for an arctic fox seeking a breeding site.

The institute said in a research article the fox’s movements were monitored across glaciers and extensive stretches of sea ice with a satellite tracking collar it put on the animal in July 2017.

The state-run agency says the roughly 2-year-old fox moved at an average rate of 28.7 miles per day.

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