Attorney general to release Mueller report’s ‘principal conclusions’ as early as today | TribLIVE.com
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Attorney general to release Mueller report’s ‘principal conclusions’ as early as today

The Washington Post
925194_web1_913342-607c8181815746728a071be98924dd9b
AP
Attorney General William Barr is expected to make public as early as today the principal conclusions of special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into whether the Trump campaign coordinated with the Kremlin to influence the 2016 election, giving the public its first glimpse into the findings of the 22-month probe.
925194_web1_911511-a5140b74b4f84678aeb6b91c9e9a4534
AP
Attorney General William Barr is expected to make public as early as today the principal conclusions of special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into whether the Trump campaign coordinated with the Kremlin to influence the 2016 election, giving the public its first glimpse into the findings of the 22-month probe.

Attorney General William Barr is expected to make public as early as today the principal conclusions of special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into whether the Trump campaign coordinated with the Kremlin to influence the 2016 election, giving the public its first glimpse into the findings of the 22-month probe.

Barr announced Friday that Mueller’s work had come to an end and spent the afternoon and early evening in his fifth-floor office reading the special counsel’s final report — which one Justice Department official described as a “comprehensive” document.

Barr told lawmakers in a letter that he “may be in a position to advise you of the Special Counsel’s principal conclusions” as early as this weekend. A Justice Department spokeswoman said those conclusions would be made public, and officials said it was possible — though not certain — they would be revealed on Saturday. The spokeswoman declined to otherwise describe what was in the report.

The submission of Mueller’s report ended his closely watched inquiry, a probe that has engulfed the Trump administration since its inception, leading to criminal charges against 34 people, including six former Trump associates and advisers.

A senior Justice Department official said the special counsel has not recommended any further indictments — a revelation that buoyed Trump’s supporters, even as additional Trump-related investigations continue in other parts of the Justice Department.

Democrats and others reacted to the end of Mueller’s probe by calling for the full report to be released. Though Mueller is not recommending additional criminal charges, his findings could prove politically damaging to the president.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., issued a joint statement saying that the report and “underlying documentation” must be provided to Congress.

Trump’s supporters, meanwhile, took news of the report’s filing as an optimistic indication that he was on the cusp of being vindicated after nearly two years under Mueller’s microscope.

“The fact that there are no more indictments is a big deal,” said David Bossie, a top Trump ally. “This president has had his entire two-year presidency under a cloud of this fake, made-up Russian collusion story.”

Trump flew to his Florida resort on Friday, accompanied by senior aides and White House lawyers. White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said the next steps “are up to Attorney General Barr, and we look forward to the process taking its course. The White House has not received or been briefed on the Special Counsel’s report.”

The conclusions that Barr is expected to release could be brief and high-level – which surely would leave lawmakers and others unsatisfied. Earlier this month, the House voted nearly unanimously to urge the Justice Department to release Mueller’s report in its entirety.

Barr and Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein have noted publicly that Justice Department policies generally discourage prosecutors from making public any unflattering information about those they decide not to charge, or information that is classified or gathered by a grand jury. In his letter to lawmakers Friday, Barr said he would consult with Rosenstein and Mueller, who remains special counsel though his investigation is complete, “to determine what other information from the report can be released to Congress and the public consistent with the law, including the Special Counsel regulations, and the Department’s long-standing practices and policies.”

Those discussions will likely last significantly beyond the weekend. And no matter what Barr decides, lawmakers might upend his plans by subpoenaing documents and summoning witnesses to testify about the now-concluded Mueller probe.

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