Authorities: Montana man assaulted boy who kept hat on during anthem | TribLIVE.com
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Authorities: Montana man assaulted boy who kept hat on during anthem

Associated Press
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Montana Department of Corrections
Montana authorities have charged Curt James Brockway of Superior, Mont., with assault on a minor after a witness said he threw a 13-year-old boy to the ground because the boy didn’t remove his hat during the national anthem at a rodeo. Brockway made an initial court appearance Monday, Aug. 5, 2019, and is expected to enter a plea on Aug. 14 in District Court in Superior.

SUPERIOR, Mont. — A man is facing an assault charge after Montana authorities say someone saw him throw a 13-year-old boy to the ground because the teenager didn’t remove his hat when the national anthem was played at a rodeo.

The boy was taken to a hospital in Spokane, Wash., but details about his condition were not released.

The witness, Taylor Hennick, told the Missoulian she was at the rodeo on Saturday when she heard a “pop” and saw the boy on the ground, bleeding from his ears. The assailant justified his actions by saying the boy “was disrespecting the national anthem so he had every right to do that,” Hennick said.

“There was a little boy lying on the ground,” she said. “He was bleeding out of his ears, seizing on the ground, just not coherent.” She said she recognized the boy as a family member’s neighbor.

Curt James Brockway, 39, of Superior, Mont., made an initial court appearance Monday on a charge of assault on a minor. Prosecutors recommended his bail be set at $100,000. Court officials said Brockway’s attorney was working Tuesday to recommend conditions that might allow Brockway be released without posting bond.

Brockway is a registered violent offender after being convicted of a 2010 charge of assault with a weapon. District Judge John Larson gave him a 10-year suspended sentence. Brockway is scheduled to be arraigned Aug. 14, when he’ll be asked to enter a plea.

Brockway’s attorney, Lance Jasper, was not in the office Tuesday and did not immediately return a phone call or an email seeking comment.

Conduct during the playing of the national anthem has been an issue in recent years, with some NFL players kneeling to protest police brutality. President Trump once called for NFL owners to fire players who kneel or engage in other acts of protest during the anthem.

The U.S. flag code says people should face the flag during the national anthem. Military members in uniform should salute while those out of uniform may do so. Men not in uniform should remove their hats and civilians should put their right hand over their heart, according to the code.

There was no indication the boy in this case was protesting in any way.

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