Baby boom: 9 labor unit nurses pregnant at Maine hospital | TribLIVE.com
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Baby boom: 9 labor unit nurses pregnant at Maine hospital

Associated Press
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AP
In this March 23, 2019 photo, eight labor and delivery nurses at Maine Medical Center hold up cards with their due dates in Portland, Maine. Nine nurses at the Portland hospital’s labor and delivery unit are pregnant. The pictured nurses, from left to right, are Erin Grenier, Rachel Stellmach, Brittney Verville, Lonnie Souci, Amanda Spear, Samantha Giglio, Nicole Barnes and Holly Selby. Nicole Goldberg is not pictured.
935138_web1_935138-37542dd6222843739d327f4a5061b52a
AP
In this March 23, 2019 photo, eight labor and delivery nurses at Maine Medical Center hold up cards with their due dates in Portland, Maine. Nine nurses at the Portland hospital’s labor and delivery unit are pregnant. The pictured nurses, from left to right, are Erin Grenier, Rachel Stellmach, Brittney Verville, Lonnie Souci, Amanda Spear, Samantha Giglio, Nicole Barnes and Holly Selby. Nicole Goldberg is not pictured.

PORTLAND, Maine — Nine nurses who work in the labor and delivery unit at the largest hospital in Maine are expecting babies in the next few months. Maine Medical Center announced the bonanza of babies with a Facebook post on Monday featuring eight of the nine nurses and their respective bumps.

The army of infants is expected to arrive between April and July. The Portland hospital’s photo showed the nurses wearing their hospital scrubs and holding cards indicating their due dates. There were pinks and blues among the cards, along with two yellows and a green.

The nurses are supporting each other during their pregnancies. WMTW-TV reports they plan to be there for each other’s deliveries. The hospital says all nine of them are registered nurses.

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