Bikers gather for emotional ceremony following deadly crash | TribLIVE.com
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Bikers gather for emotional ceremony following deadly crash

Associated Press
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A motorcycle passes as a woman leaves flowers at the scene of a fatal accident on Route 2 in Randolph, N.H., Saturday, June 22, 2019. Investigators pleaded Saturday for members of the public to come forward with information that could help them determine why a pickup truck hauling a trailer collided with a group of motorcycles on a rural highway.
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This photo provided by Miranda Thompson shows the scene where several motorcycles and a pickup truck collided on a rural, two-lane highway Friday, June 21, 2019 in Randolph, N.H. New Hampshire State Police said a 2016 Dodge 2500 pickup truck collided with the riders on U.S. 2 Friday evening. The cause of the deadly collision is not yet known. The pickup truck was on fire when emergency crews arrived.
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This photo provided by Miranda Thompson shows a man talking on his cellphone at the scene where several motorcycles and a pickup truck collided on a rural, two-lane highway Friday, June 21, 2019 in Randolph, N.H. New Hampshire State Police said a 2016 Dodge 2500 pickup truck collided with the riders on U.S. 2 Friday evening. The cause of the deadly collision is not yet known. The pickup truck was on fire when emergency crews arrived.
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AP
This photo provided by Miranda Thompson shows the scene where several motorcycles and a pickup truck collided on a rural, two-lane highway Friday, June 21, 2019 in Randolph, N.H. New Hampshire State Police said a 2016 Dodge 2500 pickup truck collided with the riders on U.S. 2 Friday evening. The cause of the deadly collision is not yet known. The pickup truck was on fire when emergency crews arrived.
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Tire marks are visible Saturday, June 22, 2019, at the scene of a deadly crash involving motorcyclists with a club comprised of ex-United States Marines, who collided with a pickup truck on a rural highway late Friday in Randolph, N.H. Investigators pleaded Saturday for members of the public to come forward with information that could help them determine why the pickup truck hauling a trailer collided with a group of motorcycles on a rural highway, killing several bikers.
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People recover personal items from the scene of a fatal accident on Route 2 in Randolph, N.H., Saturday, June 22, 2019. Investigators pleaded Saturday for members of the public to come forward with information that could help them determine why a pickup truck hauling a trailer collided with a group of motorcycles on a rural highway.

COLUMBIA, N.H. — A long-planned Blessing of the Bikes ceremony for motorcycle enthusiasts became a grief-filled memorial Sunday as hundreds converged to mourn seven bikers killed in a devastating crash with a pickup truck .

About 400 motorcyclists gathered in Columbia, New Hampshire, for the ceremony — which is periodically held, but had special meaning for the motorcycle community in wake of the accident involving members of the Marine JarHeads, a motorcycle club that includes Marines and their spouses.

“When they fall, we all fall,” said Laura Cardinal, Vice President of the Manchester Motorcycle Club, adding that fellow bikers will support the families of those who died. “Those families, they’re going to go through a lot now. They have a new world ahead of them.”

Authorities on Sunday identified the deceased bikers as Michael Ferazzi, 62, of Contoocook, New Hampshire; Albert Mazza, 49, of Lee, New Hampshire; Desma Oakes, 42, of Concord, New Hampshire; Aaron Perry, 45, of Farmington, New Hampshire; Daniel Pereira, 58, of Riverside, Rhode Island; and Joanne and Edward Corr, both 58, of Lakeville, Massachusetts. All were members or supporters of JarHeads.

A pickup truck towing a flatbed trailer collided with the group of 10 motorcycles around 6:30 p.m. Friday on U.S. 2, a two-lane highway in Randolph, New Hampshire, a tiny North Woods community. The pickup truck caught fire, and witnesses described a “devastating” scene as bystanders tried to help the injured amid shattered motorcycles.

Sunday’s Blessing of the Bikes was initially expected to draw closer to 100 or 200 people. The ceremonies, which happen in many locations, are a way to bless riders and their bikes for a safe season. The Rev. Rich Baillargeon presided, blessing the bikes using a branch dipped in holy water as they filed by.

Baillargeon held a moment of silence and prayer for those who died in the crash. At the blessing service and elsewhere, the tragedy left the close-knit motorcycle community in shock, with many remembering their own close calls on the road.

“Seven people. C’mon. It’s senseless,” said Bill Brown, a 73-year-old Vietnam War veteran and motorcyclist, who visited the accident scene Saturday to put down flags. “Somebody made a mistake, and it turned out to be pretty deadly.”

Gary and Sheila Judkins came Sunday from Sumner, Maine in part because of the crash, saying they felt it was a way to feel connected to other riders.

“It’s a positive thing for bikers. And if anything, bikers need something positive,” Gary Judkins said.

This weekend’s long-planned “Blessing of the Bikes” ceremony took place an hour to the north of the accident. Meanwhile, members of the motorcycle community had already begun organizing help for the victims’ families, said Cat Wilson, who organizes a motorcycle charity event in Massachusetts and is a friend of some of the crash victims.

Investigators on Saturday identified the pickup driver as Volodoymyr Zhukovskyy, 23, an employee of Westfield Transport, a company in Springfield, Massachusetts.

Zhukovskyy survived the accident, did not need to be hospitalized and has not been charged, authorities have said. A man reached by phone who identified himself as Zhukovskyy’s father said his son is cooperating with the investigation and is back in Massachusetts.

Dartanyan Gasanov, the owner of Westfield Transport, told The Boston Globe that he planned to talk to investigators Monday and has been unable to reach Zhukovskyy, who has not been answering phone calls.

The National Transportation Safety Board is among the agencies investigating. Authorities asked for the public’s help in the form of videos, photos or other information about the accident or the vehicles involved.

“This is one of the worst tragic incidents that we have investigated here in the state,” New Hampshire State Police Col. Chris Wagner said Saturday. “It’s going to be a very lengthy investigation.”

Republican Gov. Chris Sununu ordered flags to fly at half-staff Monday in honor of the victims

Along with the seven dead, state police said three people were taken to hospitals. Two of them were released Saturday and another was in stable condition.

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