Billionaire diamond trader dies during penis enlargement operation | TribLIVE.com
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Billionaire diamond trader dies during penis enlargement operation

Samson X Horne
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Ehud Arye Laniado/Facebook
Ehud Arye Laniado

A billionaire diamond trader has died after complications during a medical procedure aimed at enhancing his private parts.

The Toronto Sun reports that Israeli-Belgian dual citizen Ehud Arye Laniado, who founded Omega Diamonds, died at an upscale Paris hospital during a penis enlargement procedure.

“Farewell to a visionary businessman. It is with great sadness that we confirm that our founder Ehud Arye Laniado has passed away,” the statement read.

A fatal heart attack was triggered when a substance was injected into his penis, the Sun reported.

The 65-year-old died on the operating table.

Media reports said that Laniado suffered from a so-called Napoleon complex — meaning he was obsessed with his short stature.

Friends told the publication that the only time he forgot about his short height was when he asked his accountant to read out his bank statement, something which he did multiple times a day.

Local media reported that the late billionaire seemed to be a self-made man.

Laniado did not go to university and he started off his career as a masseuse at the Hilton hotel in Tel Aviv.

According to Fox News, a friend said: “In Antwerp, it turned out that he did have some talents. Internationally, he was one of the biggest experts in valuing raw diamonds.”

In 2015, Laniado sold the world’s most expensive diamond, called the Blue Moon of Josephine, to Hong Kong businessman and convicted felon Joseph Lau Luen Hung for 36.8 million pounds (approx. $48.4 million).

He owned the single-most expensive penthouse in Monaco, which reportedly cost well over $39 million. He also owned a house in the famous Los Angeles neighborhood of Bel Air and had a penchant for Chateau Margeaux, models, and celebrities.

The late trader’s wealth was unknown, but he was reportedly required to hand over more than $5 billion in penalties to Belgian authorities after being cited for tax evasion.

He was due to appear in court March 14.

Samson X Horne is a Tribune-Review digital producer. You can contact Samson at 412-320-7845, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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