Billions of mosquito lookalikes plague New Orleans | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World

Billions of mosquito lookalikes plague New Orleans

Associated Press
1311976_web1_1311976-c69f0bee18e14fbeb46ee24aa92bf3eb
AP
In this time exposure of 1/10 second, a swarm of blind mosquitoes, or aquatic midges, is seen as traffic drives on the Causeway Bridge, with dead ones on the pavement, over Lake Pontchartrain, in Jefferson Parish, outside New Orleans, Tuesday, June 18, 2019. Billions of mosquito lookalikes are showing up in the New Orleans area, blanketing car windshields, littering the ground with bodies and even scaring some folks. They’re aquatic midges, also called “blind mosquitoes,” but these flies don’t bite. However, the Motorist Assistance Patrol on the 24-mile-long Lake Pontchartrain Causeway has been stocking extra water to slosh down windshields.
1311976_web1_1311976-80a2ffda63f2440e8df69a6c722f5642
AP
Blind mosquitoes, or aquatic midges, cover the front grill of a truck driven by motorist Blake Campo, who stopped along the Causeway Bridge over Lake Pontchartrain after he could no longer see through his windshield, due to swarms of the insects, in Jefferson Parish, La., outside New Orleans Tuesday, June 18, 2019. Billions of mosquito lookalikes are showing up in the New Orleans area, blanketing car windshields, littering the ground with bodies and even scaring some folks. They’re aquatic midges, also called “blind mosquitoes,” but these flies don’t bite. However, the Motorist Assistance Patrol on the 24-mile-long Lake Pontchartrain Causeway has been stocking extra water to slosh down windshields.
1311976_web1_1311976-4498ff2d02c74b2abda8ece4832a551e
AP
Motorist Blake Campo uses liquid wax, the only liquid he had, to clean his bug covered windshield, which became opaque after driving through swarms of blind mosquitoes, or aquatic midges, on the Causeway Bridge over Lake Pontchartrain, in Jefferson Parish, La., outside New Orleans Tuesday, June 18, 2019. Billions of mosquito lookalikes are showing up in the New Orleans area, blanketing car windshields, littering the ground with bodies and even scaring some folks. They’re aquatic midges, also called “blind mosquitoes,” but these flies don’t bite. However, the Motorist Assistance Patrol on the 24-mile-long Lake Pontchartrain Causeway has been stocking extra water to slosh down windshields.
1311976_web1_1311976-250752b253aa40deb7b291925140f331
AP
Blind mosquitoes, or aquatic midges, are seen on a windshield at New Orleans Lakefront Airport in New Orleans, Thursday, June 13, 2019. Billions of mosquito lookalikes are showing up in the New Orleans area, blanketing car windshields, littering the ground with bodies and even scaring some folks. They’re aquatic midges, also called “blind mosquitoes,” but these flies don’t bite. However, the Motorist Assistance Patrol on the 24-mile-long Lake Pontchartrain Causeway has been stocking extra water to slosh down windshields.

NEW ORLEANS — Billions of mosquito lookalikes are showing up in the New Orleans area, blanketing car windshields, littering the ground with little bodies and even scaring some folks.

They’re aquatic midges, often called “blind mosquitoes.” They don’t bite, and they’re good for the environment, but they sure can be a nuisance.

Entomologist Nick Delisi of the St. Tammany Mosquito Abatement District says “They tend to emerge in the billions, with a b.”

Sloshing down bug-spattered windshields has become such a chore that the manager of the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway says Motorist Assistance Patrol trucks on the 24-mile-long bridge have had to replenish their water almost daily.

Mosquito control officials say they don’t plan to do anything to control the swarms, because they die in less than a week and their larvae clean up waterways.

Categories: News | World | Travel
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.