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Climate protesters march in London again; arrests hit 710 | TribLIVE.com
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Climate protesters march in London again; arrests hit 710

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Police speak to a demonstrator on the main thoroughfare on Waterloo Bridge in central London, Saturday April 20, 2019. Climate protesters with the environmental pressure group Extinction Rebellion are once again shutting down parts of London using civic disobedience to urge residents and government to do more to protect the Earth from rising temperatures.(Victoria Jones/PA via AP)
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LONDON — London police said more than 710 people were arrested and about 28 charged since climate change protests began last week in the British capital.

The Extinction Rebellion protests started Monday and have at times paralyzed parts of London, with peaceful demonstrations at Waterloo Bridge, Oxford Circus and other key landmarks.

Protesters were out again Saturday, urging the British government to make fighting climate change its top priority.

London police have taken a cautious approach rather than a massive show of force to remove the demonstrators, saying they respect the right to peaceful protest.

They still had to ask neighboring forces for some 200 additional officers to help cope with the situation, and many officers had their weekend leaves canceled.

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