Documents: $6 million to family of Neil Armstrong in wrongful death | TribLIVE.com
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Documents: $6 million to family of Neil Armstrong in wrongful death

Associated Press
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AP
In this Friday, Oct. 26, 2007 file photo, former astronaut Neil Armstrong speaks during a dinner in his honor at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind. Court documents show that an Ohio hospital paid the estate of astronaut Armstrong $6 million to settle allegations that post-surgical complications led to his 2012 death.

CINCINNATI — An Ohio hospital paid the estate of astronaut Neil Armstrong $6 million in a confidential agreement to settle allegations that post-surgical complications led to Armstrong’s 2012 death, according to court documents and a report in the New York Times.

The 2014 settlement went to 10 family members, including Armstrong’s two sons, sister, brother and six grandchildren, according to documents filed with the Hamilton County Probate Court in Cincinnati which were publicly available on Tuesday. Armstrong’s widow, Carol, did not receive any money in the settlement.

Armstrong’s sons, Mark and Rick, contended care provided by Mercy Health-Fairfield Hospital cost their father his life, according to the New York Times.

The 50th anniversary of Neil Armstrong’s first steps on the moon was celebrated Saturday. He died on Aug. 25, 2012.

A Sept. 24, 2014 motion to seal the settlement said the hospital and its caregivers stood by the treatment they provided.

“However, the hospital, on behalf of itself and the health care providers, agreed to a confidential settlement of $6 million to avoid the publicity the Estate might have initiated on behalf of certain members of the family if settlement had not been reached,” the document said.

Hospital spokeswoman Maureen Richmond declined to offer specifics on the matter, saying she was unable to discuss any individual’s care.

In an email statement to The Associated Press, she added: “The public nature of these details is very disappointing — both for our ministry and the patient’s family who had wished to keep this legal matter private.”

Messages were left for Armstrong’s widow and sons, and for Wendy Armstrong, Mark’s sister and a lawyer involved in motions to seal the settlement.

Carol Armstrong told the New York Times she signed off on the settlement in her role as executor but received no part of it.

Neil Armstrong was admitted to the hospital in August 2012 for vascular bypass surgery, according to a Sept. 24, 2014 motion filed by Carol Armstrong seeking to have the settlement approved.

“He underwent the cardiovascular surgery, but post-surgical complications arose and he subsequently died,” the motion said.

Most of the settlement, about $5.2 million, was split between Armstrong’s sons. The astronaut’s brother and sister each received $250,000, and six grandchildren each got $24,000. Attorneys’ fees of $160,000 were awarded.

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