2 El Paso shooting victims die at hospital, raising death toll to 22 | TribLIVE.com
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2 El Paso shooting victims die at hospital, raising death toll to 22

Associated Press
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AP
Rabbi Yisrael Greenberg looks at the makeshift memorial while paying tribute to the victims of the Saturday mass shooting at a shopping complex in El Paso, Texas, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019.
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AP
A restaurant employee looks at the scene of a mass shooting at a shopping complex Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in El Paso, Texas.
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AP
Eleven-year-old Leilani Hebben puts her head on her mother Anabel Hebben’s shoulder as they visit the scene of a mass shooting at a shopping complex Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in El Paso, Texas.
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AP
Flowers adorn a makeshift memorial near the scene of a mass shooting at a shopping complex Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in El Paso, Texas.
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This image provided by the FBI shows Patrick Crusius. A gunman opened fire in an El Paso, Texas, shopping area packed with people during the busy back-to-school season Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019, killing over a dozen. The FBI identified the suspect as Crusius.
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Members of the FBI evidence response team investigate the scene of a mass shooting at a shopping complex Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in El Paso, Texas.

EL PASO, Texas — A hospital official says another victim of the weekend mass shooting in El Paso, Texas, has died.

Dr. Stephen Flaherty, of the Del Sol Medical Center, says the patient was one of two victims of Saturday’s attack to die at the hospital on Monday. Police earlier announced the death of one of the patients.

The new deaths bring the death toll from the attack to 22. More than two dozen other people were wounded.

The attack happened hours before a separate mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, in which nine people were killed and others were wounded.

Police still haven’t released a list of the victims of Saturday’s attack, which happened hours before a separate mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, that claimed nine lives.

Speaking at the White House on Monday, President Donald Trump condemned the two attacks in which 30 people were killed and dozens of others were wounded. He called for bipartisan cooperation to respond to an epidemic of gun violence, but he offered scant details on concrete steps that could be taken.

“We vow to act with urgent resolve,” Trump said.

Federal authorities said they are weighing hate-crime charges against the suspected gunman El Paso that could carry the death penalty. The suspect, 21-year old Patrick Crusius, has been booked on state capital murder charges, which also carry a possible death penalty.

The shootings in Texas and Ohio were the 21st and 22nd mass killings of 2019 in the U.S., according to the AP/USA Today/Northeastern University mass murder database that tracks homicides where four or more people killed — not including the offender.

Including the two latest attacks, 126 people had been killed in the 2019 mass shootings.

Since 2006, 11 mass shootings — not including Saturday’s — have been committed by men who are 21 or younger.

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