Ex-President Jimmy Carter has black eye, stitches as a result of fall | TribLIVE.com
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Ex-President Jimmy Carter has black eye, stitches as a result of fall

Associated Press
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AP
Former President Jimmy Carter answers questions submitted by students during an annual Carter Town Hall held at Emory University in Atlanta. A spokeswoman for Carter said the former president fell at his home but ‘feels fine.’ Deanna Congileo said in an email that Carter fell Sunday, Oct. 6, 2019, at his home in Plains, Ga., and needed stitches above his brow. Carter turned 95 on Tuesday, becoming the first U.S. president to reach that milestone.

NASHVILLE — Former President Jimmy Carter had a black eye and 14 stitches after falling at his Georgia home on Sunday, but made it to an evening concert in Tennessee to rally volunteers ahead of his 36th home building project for Habitat for Humanity.

The 39th president fell earlier in the day at his Plains, Ga., home and required the stitches above his brow. By Sunday evening, Carter was on stage at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville with his wife Rosalynn, 92, to talk to volunteers and supporters of the building project that runs through Friday.

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AP
Former President Jimmy Carter leads a morning devotion for volunteers at a Habitat for Humanity building project Monday, Oct. 7, 2019, in Nashville, Tenn. Carter fell at his home on Sunday, requiring more than a dozen stitches, but he did not let his injuries keep him from participating in his 36th building project with the nonprofit Christian housing organization. He turned 95 last Tuesday, becoming the first U.S. president to reach that milestone.

Carter turned 95 last Tuesday, becoming the first U.S. president to reach that milestone.

He told the audience Sunday evening that he had to go to the hospital and get 14 stitches, “but I had a No. 1 priority and that was to come to Nashville and build houses.”

Carter wore an Atlanta Braves baseball cap, but his left eye was swollen and bruised and he had a white bandage above his eye. The Carters were introduced by country stars Garth Brooks and Trisha Yearwood, who called the Carters the hardest working volunteers, and sang a couple of duets during the concert.

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AP
With a bandage above his left eye and a large, red welt below it, former President Jimmy Carter builds corbels at a Habitat for Humanity project Monday, Oct. 7, 2019, in Nashville, Tenn. Carter fell at home on Sunday, requiring 14 stitches, but he did not let his injuries keep him from participating in his 36th building project with the nonprofit Christian housing organization. He turned 95 last Tuesday, becoming the first U.S. president to reach that milestone.

Rosalynn Carter praised the country couple for volunteering at previous Habitat for Humanity building projects, saying she once saw Yearwood way up in the rafters of a home working hard during construction.

Former President Carter then joked, “While Garth just watched her,” which drew laughs from the crowd and Yearwood. Carter seemed to be in good spirits and came out a short time later to point to his baseball cap and mention that the Braves beat the St. Louis Cardinals that day as well.

Twenty-one homes are scheduled to be built in a neighborhood in Nashville. The concert also featured performances by Melinda Doolittle, the Fisk Jubilee Singers and members of the Nashville Symphony Quartet.

Carter survived a dire cancer diagnosis in 2015 and surpassed George H.W. Bush as the longest-lived U.S. president in history this spring. He has had some trouble walking after a hip replacement in May, but regularly teaches Sunday School.

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AP
Former President Jimmy Carter speaks during the Habitat for Humanity Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter Work Project opening ceremony at the Ryman Auditorium, Sunday, Oct. 6, 2019, in Nashville, Tenn. Carter had a black eye and stitches after falling at his Georgia home on Sunday, but made it to the evening program in Nashville.
Meanwhile, he has continued with his humanitarian work. And he also has occasionally weighed in on politics and policy, recently expressing hopes that his Carter Center will become a more forceful advocate against armed conflicts in the future, including “wars by the United States.”

“I just want to keep the whole world at peace,” Carter had said as he presented his annual Carter Center report last month.

“We have been at war more than 226 years. We have been at peace for about 16 years” since the Declaration of Independence in 1776, he said, adding that every U.S. military conflict from the Korean War onward has been a war of “choice.”

Carter also has been accepting visits from several 2020 presidential candidates, but he’s held back on endorsing any of his fellow Democrats, offering few clues to his thinking.

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