5th death linked to storm that walloped Houston area | TribLIVE.com
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5th death linked to storm that walloped Houston area

Associated Press
1707744_web1_1707744-d84f59017abd43a69563c0b4a5d2bc80
Houston Chronicle via AP
A truck drives through a flooded highway as flooding from the remnants of Tropical Storm Imelda continues in Southeast Texas on Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, in Mauriceville, Texas.
1707744_web1_1707744-d5eb6b91f82a427081ba7ea66cfa6e07
Houston Chronicle via AP
Stephen Gilbert, left, and his father-in-law sit in front of their flooded property on Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, in the Mauriceville, Texas, area.

BEAUMONT, Texas — The widespread damage brought to the Houston area by one of the wettest tropical cyclones in U.S. history came into broader view Saturday, as floodwaters receded to reveal the exhausting cleanup effort that lies ahead for many communities and homeowners.

Hundreds of homes and other buildings in the region, extending eastward from Houston and across the Louisiana border, were damaged by Imelda, as the one-time tropical storm slowly churned across the region, dumping more than 40 inches of rain in some spots and being blamed for at least five deaths.

Officials in Harris County, which is home to Houston, were trying to determine if millions of dollars in uninsured losses were enough to trigger a federal disaster declaration, Francisco Sanchez, a spokesman for the county’s Office of Emergency Management, said Saturday.

Authorities raised the storm’s death toll to five, saying it is believed to have killed a 52-year-old Florida man who was found dead Thursday in his stranded pickup truck along Interstate 10 near Beaumont, which is near Texas’ border with Louisiana. Jefferson County spokeswoman Allison Getz said that although floodwaters seeped into Mark Dukaj’s truck, investigators don’t believe he drowned, though they do believe his death is storm-related. An autopsy will determine the cause.

A section of the highway just east of Houston remained closed Saturday after at least two runaway barges struck two bridges carrying eastbound and westbound traffic. Nearly 123,000 vehicles normally cross the bridges each day, according to the Texas Department of Transportation. The Coast Guard has said that witnesses reported early Friday that nine barges had broken away from their moorings at a shipyard.

Two barges remain lodged against the bridges, said Emily Black, a spokeswoman for the state Transportation Department.

“The current is really very strong right now so it’s kind of pushed them up against the columns right now,” she said.

Inspectors hope that the water will recede and the current will slow down enough for the barges to be removed this weekend so that a better assessment of the damage to the bridges can be made.

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