Freedom sought for U.S. teen jailed in Rome police slaying | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World

Freedom sought for U.S. teen jailed in Rome police slaying

Associated Press
1492663_web1_1492663-a2a58083f4f8464b9fa3beb3e6a6a615
AP
Ethan Elder, father of Finnegan Lee Elder, in custody for the slaying of Carabinieri officer Mario Cerciello Rega, leaves Regina Celi prison in Rome on Friday after seeing his son.

ROME — A lawyer for one of two American teens jailed in the investigation of an Italian police officer’s slaying has petitioned for his client’s release.

Francesco Petrelli said Friday he didn’t know when a tribunal would hear the appeal, filed a day earlier, on behalf of Gabriel Christian Natale-Hjorth, 18.

Natale-Hjorth and fellow Californian Finnegan Lee Elder, 19, are being held in a Rome jail while prosecutors probe the slaying of an unarmed officer, Mario Cerciello Rega, who was knifed 11 times on July 26.

Prosecutors contend Elder stabbed the officer during a scuffle while Natale-Hjorth allegedly punched and kicked the officer’s partner. The plainclothes officers were investigating an alleged extortion attempt by the teens involving a stolen knapsack.

Prosecutors say Elder claims self-defense and that both teens say they didn’t realize the two men were police officers.

Categories: News | World
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.