Funeral scheduled for detective who fought for Sept. 11 fund | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World

Funeral scheduled for detective who fought for Sept. 11 fund

Associated Press
1360261_web1_1360261-d350604818d94151a63b0a00fcfebc4d
AP
This still image taken from video shows retired NYPD Detective and 9/11 responder, Luis Alvarez speaks during a hearing by the House Judiciary Committee as it considers permanent authorization of the Victim Compensation Fund, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 11, 2019. Alvarez died Saturday, June 29 at age 53.
1360261_web1_1360261-405a6fab0d32461da543ed6e05324228
New York City Police Department
Former NYPD Detective Luis Alvarez was a leader in the fight for the Sept. 11 Victims Compensation Fund. He died on Saturday. Alvarez was diagnosed with colorectal cancer in 2016. He blamed his illness on the three months he spent in the rubble of the World Trade Center’s twin towers after the 2001 terrorist attacks. He was 53 years old.

NEW YORK — A funeral will be held Wednesday for a former New York City police detective who was a leader in the fight for the Sept. 11 Victim Compensation Fund.

Detective Luis Alvarez appeared with former “Daily Show” host Jon Stewart last month to plead with Congress to extend the compensation fund.

Alvarez, who died Saturday of colorectal cancer, was admitted to a hospice within days of his testimony.

His funeral will be held at the Immaculate Conception Church in the Astoria neighborhood of Queens.

Alvarez spent three months in the World Trade Center rubble after the 2001 attacks.

Researchers continue to study potential links between responders’ illnesses and toxins from the cleanup.

The bill to replenish the fund that provides compensation to those responders passed a congressional committee unanimously.

Categories: News | World
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.