Google Maps routed dozens of drivers into a muddy field | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World

Google Maps routed dozens of drivers into a muddy field

Steven Adams
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File

Motorists following a detour soon found themselves axle-deep in mud.

Dozens of drivers on Sunday were making their way through traffic in the Denver area when their navigation apps led them astray, reports TheDenverChannel.com.

“Google Maps asked us to take the Tower exit, so I did because it was supposed to be half the time,” Connie Monsees told TheDenverChannel.com.

“My thought was, ‘Well there are all these other cars in front of me so it must be OK.’ So I just continued,” she told the news station.

The region had reportedly gotten rain earlier in the week and what may have normally been a dirt road was a muddy mess on Sunday.

“That’s when I thought, ‘Oh this was a bad decision,’” Monsees continued.

“I tore up the inside passenger wheel well for my tire, but it’s not that big of a deal compared to some other people who really tore their cars up and got themselves stuck out there,” she told TheDenverChannel.com.

About 100 cars reportedly tried the detour and had difficulty turning around because the dirt path just one narrow lane through a field.

Monsees car has four-wheel drive so she was able to continue her trip to the airport. She told TheDenverChannel.com that she took along two othes from the muddy debacle.

Read more details at TheDenverChannel.com.

Steven Adams is a Tribune-Review digital producer. You can contact Steven at 412-380-5645 or [email protected].

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