House OKs measure to prevent possible end-of-month shutdown | TribLIVE.com
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House OKs measure to prevent possible end-of-month shutdown

Associated Press
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AP
On this Sept. 12, 2019, photo, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., speaks at the Capitol in Washington. The good news is that it doesn’t look like a bitterly polarized Washington will stumble into another government shutdown. But as Democrats controlling the House unveil a stopgap, government-wide spending bill to keep the lights on and pay the troops, there’s scant evidence that power sharing in the U.S. Capitol will produce further legislative accomplishments anytime soon.

WASHINGTON — The House has passed a short-term ending bill to prevent a federal shutdown when the budget year ends Sept. 30.

The bipartisan measure, approved by a 301-123 vote, would give lawmakers until the Thanksgiving break to negotiate and pass $1.4 trillion worth of annual agency spending bills.

The Senate is scheduled to approve the stopgap measure next week.

The agency spending bills would fill in the details of this summer’s budget and debt agreement between President Donald Trump and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

The House-passed measure also extends some expiring federal programs and replenishes Trump’s bailout of farmers who’ve been hurt by the U.S. trade dispute with China.

Senators are tied up in knots over how to proceed on the 12 annual spending bills.

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