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Indian Army says they found evidence of the Yeti | TribLIVE.com
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Indian Army says they found evidence of the Yeti

Frank Carnevale
1093328_web1_AFP_1G18AI
Getty Images
In this handout photo taken by the Indian Army on April 9, 2019, Indian men measure large foot prints in the snow, sighted by the Indian Army, near the Makalu Base Camp in the North-Eastern Himalayas. - Pictures of a “Yeti footprint” the Indian Army posted on social media have triggered a barage of mockery. “For the first time, an #IndianArmy Moutaineering Expedition Team has sited Mysterious Footprints of mythical beast ‘Yeti’,” a tweet on the army’s official account said on April 29, alongside three images of prints in the snow.
1093328_web1_AFP_1G18AK
Getty Images
In this handout photo taken by the Indian Army on April 9, 2019, large foot prints are seen in the snow, sighted by the Indian Army, near the Makalu Base Camp in the North-Eastern Himalayas. - Pictures of a “Yeti footprint” the Indian Army posted on social media have triggered a barage of mockery. “For the first time, an #IndianArmy Moutaineering Expedition Team has sited Mysterious Footprints of mythical beast ‘Yeti’,” a tweet on the army’s official account said on April 29, alongside three images of prints in the snow.

The Indian Army believes they found evidence of the mysterious — and mythical — Yeti in the Himalayas.

The army posted to its official Twitter account on Monday, “For the first time, an #IndianArmy Moutaineering Expedition Team has sited Mysterious Footprints of mythical beast ‘Yeti’ measuring 32×15 inches close to Makalu Base Camp on 09 April 2019. This elusive snowman has only been sighted at Makalu-Barun National Park in the past.”

The photos released by the army show large foot prints, measuring 32 by 15 inches, in the snow. The photos were taken near the Makalu Base Camp on the border of Nepal and Tibet in the North-Eastern Himalayas.

The Yeti, also known as the abominable snowman, is an ape-like creature of legend that roams the snowy Himalayas, as well as Siberia, and Central and East Asia.

The post was meant with lots of skepticism and mockery online.

One user provided this explanation:

Frank Carnevale is a Tribune-Review digital producer. You can contact Frank via Twitter .

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