Jimmy Carter out of hospital after treatment for fall | TribLIVE.com
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Jimmy Carter out of hospital after treatment for fall

Associated Press
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AP
In this Sept. 18, 2019, file photo former President Jimmy Carter acknowledges a student who’s question has been picked for him to answer during an annual Carter Town Hall held at Emory University in Atlanta.

ATLANTA — Former President Jimmy Carter is out of the hospital where he was treated after fracturing his pelvis in a recent fall, a spokeswoman said Thursday.

Carter Center spokeswoman Deanna Congileo said in a statement that the former president had been released from Phoebe Sumter Medical Center and was recovering at his home in Plains, Georgia.

Carter, 95, fell Monday evening at his home. Congileo had said in a statement earlier that his fracture was minor, and he was in good spirits at the hospital and looking forward to recovering at home.

It was the third time Carter fell in recent months. He first fell in the spring and required hip replacement surgery. Carter fell again Oct. 6 and despite receiving 14 stitches, traveled the same day to Nashville, Tennessee, to rally volunteers and, later, to help build a Habitat for Humanity home.

Carter is the oldest living former president in U.S. history. He and 92-year-old wife Rosalynn recently became the longest married first couple, surpassing George and Barbara Bush, with more than 73 years of marriage.

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