Man dies after competing in California taco-eating contest | TribLIVE.com
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Man dies after competing in California taco-eating contest

Associated Press
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AP
This Sept. 18, 2015 photo shows fans arrive at Chukchansi Park in Fresno, Calif., for a minor-league baseball game between the Fresno Grizzlies and the Round Rock Express. Fresno authorities say a man died shortly after competing in a taco-eating contest at a Grizzlies game. Fresno Sheriff spokesman Tony Botti says 41-year-old Dana Hutchings, of Fresno, died Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2019 shortly after arriving at a hospital. Botti says an autopsy on Hutchings will be done Thursday to determine a cause of death.

FRESNO, Calif. — Authorities say a man died shortly after competing in a taco-eating contest at a minor league baseball game

Fresno Sheriff spokesman Tony Botti says 41-year-old Dana Hutchings, of Fresno, died Tuesday night shortly after arriving at a hospital.

Botti says an autopsy on Hutchings will be done to determine a cause of death. It was not immediately known how many tacos the man had eaten, or whether he had won the contest.

Fresno Grizzlies spokesman Derek Franks did not immediately respond to an email from The Associated Press.

KSNF-TV reports Tuesday night’s competition allowed amateurs to qualify for Saturday’s World Taco Eating Championship to be held at Fresno’s annual Taco Truck Throwdown.

During the 2018 Taco Eating Championship in Fresno, professional eater Geoff Esper downed 73 tacos in eight minutes.

Categories: News | World | Food Drink
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