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Memories of 2016 flood haunt Baton Rouge ahead of Barry

Associated Press
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AP
Memories of an epic 2016 flood that caused billions of dollars in damage had Louisiana’s capital on edge Friday, July 12, 2019, as Barry gained strength in the Gulf of Mexico.
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AP
Memories of an epic 2016 flood that caused billions of dollars in damage had Louisiana’s capital on edge Friday, July 12, 2019, as Barry gained strength in the Gulf of Mexico.
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AP
Tiffany Favre, left, and her son, Brandon, use blocks to raise their couch off the floor Friday, July 12, 2019, in Baton Rouge, La., ahead of Tropical Storm Barry.
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AP
Tiffany Favre, right, and her son, Brandon, use blocks to raise their couch off the floor Friday, July 12, 2019, in Baton Rouge, La., ahead of Tropical Storm Barry.
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AP
Resident fill sandbags Friday, July 12, 2019, in Baton Rouge, La., ahead of Tropical Storm Barry.

BATON ROUGE, La. — Memories of an epic flood that caused billions of dollars in damage had Louisiana’s capital on edge Friday as Barry gained strength in the Gulf of Mexico more than 150 miles away.

Storms that dumped more than 20 inches of rain across southeastern Louisiana three years ago left much of Baton Rouge and surrounding parishes under feet of muddy, putrid water. A dozen people died and more than 50,000 homes , businesses, churches and other structures were flooded.

So with forecasters predicting as much as 2 feet of rain across inland areas northwest of New Orleans, many residents weren’t taking any chances.

In a neighborhood just a few hundred feet from the Amite River and a creek, Tiffany Favre and her son Brandon Favre used wooden blocks to lift a new couch off their den floor. The ‘16 flood left 1 foot of water in her home, she said, and neighbors who stayed had to be plucked out by rescue helicopters.

“I’m going to get some sand bags to put in front of the doors, because that’s where it seeps in,” said Favre, who just finished painting the last set of furniture that was damaged three years ago.

A few miles away, Kaci Douglas and her 15-year-old son, Juan Causey, were among dozens of people filling sand bags at a fire station. The city said it had placed 665 tons of sand and nearly 100,000 bags at about a dozen locations for residents to use.

Douglas moved into her current home, a two-story apartment near a creek, after the 2016 flood, but she knows what happened there: About 2 feet of water filled the first floor.

Recounting that deluge and discussing her concerns about Barry, Douglas urged Juan to keep working despite the heat and the weight of the sand.

“I told my son it’s better to be safe than sorry,” she said.

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