Mike Pence heads to flooded Midwest amid concerns about levees | TribLIVE.com
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Mike Pence heads to flooded Midwest amid concerns about levees

Associated Press
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This satellite image provided by DigitalGlobe shows from top, Offutt Air Force Base near Omaha, Neb., on Aug. 10, 2018 before flooding and Offutt Air Force Base during flooding on March 18, 2019.
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This satellite image provided by DigitalGlobe shows from top, Pacific Junction, Iowa on Aug. 10, 2018 before flooding and Pacific Junction during flooding on March 18, 2019.
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Akashi Haynes, left, and her daughter Tabitha Viers carry their belongings rescued from their flooded home in Fremont, Neb., Monday, March 18, 2019.
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Tim Rockford, left, and David Bauer, tour the Bellwood Lakes neighborhood Monday, March 18, 2019, in Bellwood, Neb.
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Luke Thomas and Air Force Tech Sgt. Vanessa Vidaurre look at a flooded portion of Offutt Air Force Base, Sunday, March 17, 2019, in Bellevue, Neb.
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Gabe Schmidt, owner of Liquid Trucking, top right, travels by air boat with Glenn Wyles, top left, Mitch Snyder, bottom left, and Juan Jacobo, bottom right, as they survey damage from the flood waters of the Platte River, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019.

OMAHA, Neb. — Vice President Mike Pence is headed to the Midwest to view flood damage as farmers raise concerns that busted levees won’t be fixed before the traditional spring flood season.

Pence is scheduled to visit Omaha, Nebraska, late Tuesday afternoon. Hundreds of homes are damaged, and tens of thousands of acres are inundated with water.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says rivers breached at least a dozen levees in Nebraska, Iowa and Missouri. Flooding is expected through the week as high water levels flow down the Missouri River.

Corps official Jud Kneuvean says levees usually take six months to repair. That means most likely won’t be fixed by mid-May, the start of the most flood-prone part of the year.

The Nebraska Farm Bureau says farm and ranch losses could reach $1 billion in Nebraska alone.

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