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More snow for storm-buried Pacific Northwest | TribLIVE.com
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More snow for storm-buried Pacific Northwest

The Associated Press
| Sunday, February 10, 2019 1:30 a.m
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Jesse and Sarah Fees have their children along on a trip in North Tacoma, Wash., to restock their kitchen, Sunday, Feb. 10, 2019. Pacific Northwest residents who are more accustomed to rain than snow were digging out from a winter storm and bracing for more on Sunday.

SEATTLE — Pacific Northwest residents who are more accustomed to rain than snow were digging out from a winter storm and bracing for more on Sunday.

The sun was out but the National Weather Service said snow would return late in the afternoon into the evening across the Northwest. Snowfall amounts will range from an inch to 3 inches through Sunday night.

Light snow started to make its way into the interior lowlands in the late afternoon, the weather service said.

Storms have delivered more snow to Seattle in the first days of February than it usually gets in a year, The Seattle Times reported .

Snow was expected to push into the Puget Sound area later Sunday afternoon and continue into the early overnight hours, the weather service said. There will be a brief break before another system arrives.

“Don’t overlook that first system,” meteorologist Jacob DeFlitch told The Seattle Times. “But the second one will arrive right on its heels and looks to be more substantial. Between them, there’s not much time to spare.”

Temperatures were in the teens or single digits. Low temperature records could fall Sunday, meteorologists said.

It was 9 degrees in Arlington, Washington early Sunday. The weather service said that was colder than the Arctic coast or North Slope of Alaska.

An expected 2 feet to 4 feet from Sunday through Wednesday in the Cascades could be welcome to skiers and snowboarders, Will Ahue, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Portland, told The Oregonian.

Seattle schools will be closed Monday, along with other area schools.

In Northern California, the latest in a series of storms dusted beaches with snow and caused whiteout conditions on mountain roads. The National Weather Service office in Eureka reported accumulating snow at sea level. KIEM-TV posted photos of Clam Beach in Arcata covered in fresh powder.

The last time Humboldt County beaches saw snow was during the winter of 2002-03, forecasters said.

Categories: News | World
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