ShareThis Page
Man accused of marrying 4 women pleads guilty in New Hampshire | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World

Man accused of marrying 4 women pleads guilty in New Hampshire

Associated Press
1088306_web1_1088306-11f2d0039e82498d94251a54f3bce9d7
York County Sheriff’s Department via AP
This undated booking photo released by the York County Sheriff’s Department shows Michael Middleton, accused of marrying women in multiple states including New Hampshire. Middleton, accused of being married to multiple women, pleaded guilty Monday, April 29, 2019 to bigamy in New Hampshire but will avoid jail time if he behaves for the next five years.

DOVER, N.H. — A man accused of being married to four women pleaded guilty Monday to bigamy in New Hampshire, but he will avoid jail time if he behaves for the next five years.

Michael Middleton, 43, married a Georgia woman in 2006, an Alabama woman in 2011 and a New Hampshire woman in 2013. That led to the bigamy charge in New Hampshire, but according to court documents, he also married a fourth woman in Kentucky in 2016.

Prosecutors say he used the marriages to gain access to the women’s assets. In court Monday, Assistant Strafford County Attorney Michael Rotman read a statement from Middleton’s New Hampshire wife, Alicia Grant, who blamed Middleton for her transformation from a compassionate person to someone with a “not-my-problem” attitude.

She said she was “satisfied” that he was facing consequences for his actions.

“When we got married six years ago, what I thought I had found in him was a life partner, someone that I could face life’s ups and downs with, someone my children could look up to,” Grant wrote. “Instead I got six years of pain and misery as I tried to free myself from the prison of his lies and manipulations.”

Middleton was arrested in Ohio in February. He also has faced domestic violence charges in Maine.

As part of his 12-month suspended sentence, Middleton was ordered to undergo screenings for domestic abuse and substance abuse, and comply with any recommended counseling or programs. Neither he nor his attorney spoke at the hearing other than to answer brief questions from the judge.

After the hearing, Middleton was asked if he was sorry for his actions. He told reporters he felt “compassion and understanding” for his New Hampshire wife, Grant, after hearing her letter.

“It was a good outcome,” he said. “I hope to move forward with my life and everything and abide by everything that was handed down to me.”

Categories: News | World
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.