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New Zealand prime minister says gun laws to change after mosque attack | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World

New Zealand prime minister says gun laws to change after mosque attack

Associated Press
| Sunday, March 17, 2019 1:55 a.m
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CHRISTCHURCH, New Zealand — New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has reiterated her promise that there will be changes to the country’s gun laws in the wake of a terrorist attack on two mosques and said her Cabinet will discuss the policy details on Monday.

At a Sunday news conference, Arden used some of her strongest language yet about gun control, saying that laws need to change and “they will change.”

New Zealand has fewer restrictions on rifles or shotguns than many countries, while handguns are more tightly controlled.

Unlike the U.S., the right to own a firearm is not enshrined in New Zealand’s constitution.

Ardern declined to discuss more details until she’d talked to her Cabinet, the group of top lawmakers that guides policies.

Friday’s mass shootings in Christchurch killed 50 people.

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