Ohio man pleads not guilty in Jewish center video threat | TribLIVE.com
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Ohio man pleads not guilty in Jewish center video threat

Associated Press
1563669_web1_1563669-876fc752a9d24b7d82874d3b206cf47a
The Vindicator
James Reardon, of New Middletown, Ohio, stands with attorney Walter Richie at the jail, seen on the video arraignment for Reardon at Struthers Municipal Court in Struthers, Ohio, Monday, Aug. 19, 2019. Reardon pleaded not guilty Monday to threatening a Jewish community center in a video that authorities say showed him shooting a semi-automatic rifle.
1563669_web1_1563669-f22db36569cd4ba48139cc906a952568
The Vindicator
James Reardon, of New Middletown, Ohio, upper left, stands with attorney Walter Richie at the jail, seen on the video arraignment for Reardon at Struthers Municipal Court in Struthers, Ohio, Monday, Aug. 19, 2019. Reardon pleaded not guilty Monday to threatening a Jewish community center in a video that authorities say showed him shooting a semi-automatic rifle.
1563669_web1_1563669-e8215a22c77d403f8655a12a8980700e
Mahoning County Sheriff’s Office
This undated photo provided by the Mahoning County Sheriff’s Office shows James Reardon Jr. Police say Reardon, accused of making what they believe was a threat to a Jewish center in Ohio on Instagram, was arrested Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019, on telecommunications harassment and aggravated menacing charges.

STRUTHERS, Ohio — A 20-year-old man pleaded not guilty Monday to threatening a Jewish community center in a video that authorities say showed him shooting a semi-automatic rifle.

A judge near Youngstown set bond at $250,000 for James Reardon, ordered a mental health evaluation and told him to stay away from Jewish houses of worship and organizations if he is released from jail.

Police arrested Reardon on charges of telecommunications harassment and aggravated menacing on Saturday, a day after a Jewish organization contacted authorities.

Ammunition, semi-automatic weapons, a gas mask and anti-Semitic information were found at a house in New Middleton where he lives with his mother, police said.

New Middletown police said the video posted on Reardon’s Instagram account last month included the sounds of sirens and screaming with the caption: “Police identified the Youngstown Jewish Family Community shooter as local white nationalist Seamus O’Rearedon.”

The post tagged the Jewish Community Center of Youngstown.

The Youngstown Area Jewish Federation said it found out about the threat on Friday and alerted the police and FBI. The organization said it later learned that “ira—seamus” was an online pseudonym for James Reardon.

“I want to stress that we know of no other threat to the Jewish Community or to any of our agencies at this point it time,” said Andy Lipkin, the federation’s executive vice president. “”Nonetheless, I have directed that we maintain the additional level of security for the near future.”

Reardon was arraigned by video in Struthers Municipal Court.

A message seeking comment was left with his attorney. There was no answer at a phone number for his mother, and a man who answered a number listed for his father hung up.

Media outlets in Youngstown reported that Reardon attended the 2017 white nationalist rally that turned violent in Charlottesville, Va.

New Middletown Police Chief Vince D’egidio told WFMJ-TV that Reardon has posted several videos in which he used derogatory remarks toward the Jewish and African American communities.

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