Paris tests new bubble-shaped water taxi | TribLIVE.com
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Paris tests new bubble-shaped water taxi

Associated Press
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AP
SeaBubbles co-founder Sweden’s Anders Bringdal stands onboard a SeaBubble, Wednesday Sept. 18, 2019 in Paris. Paris is testing out a new form of travel - an eco-friendly bubble-shaped taxi that zips along the water, capable of whisking passengers up and down the Seine River. Dubbed Seabubbles, the vehicle is still in early stages, but proponents see it as a new model for the fast-changing landscape of urban mobility.
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AP
SeaBubbles co-founder Sweden’s Anders Bringdal stands onboard a SeaBubble by the Eiffel Tower on the river Seine, Wednesday Sept. 18, 2019 in Paris. Paris is testing out a new form of travel - an eco-friendly bubble-shaped taxi that zips along the water, capable of whisking passengers up and down the Seine River. Dubbed Seabubbles, the vehicle is still in early stages, but proponents see it as a new model for the fast-changing landscape of urban mobility.
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AP
In this photo taken Tuesday Sept. 17, 2019, SeaBubbles co-founder Anders Bringdal poses aboard an hydrofoil boat SeaBubble on the Seine river in Paris. Paris is testing out a new form of travel - an eco-friendly bubble-shaped taxi that zips along the water, capable of whisking passengers up and down the Seine River.
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AP
In this photo taken Tuesday Sept. 17, 2019 in Paris, a hydrofoil boat SeaBubble sails on the Seine river, in front of Notre Dame cathedral. Paris is testing out a new form of travel - an eco-friendly bubble-shaped taxi that zips along the water, capable of whisking passengers up and down the Seine River. Dubbed Seabubbles, the vehicle is still in early stages, but proponents see it as a new model for the fast-changing landscape of urban mobility.
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AP
In this photo taken Tuesday Sept. 17, 2019 a man steps into an hydrofoil boat SeaBubble in Paris. Paris is testing out a new form of travel - an eco-friendly bubble-shaped taxi that zips along the water, capable of whisking passengers up and down the Seine River.
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AP
In this photo taken Tuesday Sept. 17, 2019, SeaBubbles co-founder Anders Bringdal stand aboard an hydrofoil boat SeaBubble on the Seine river in Paris. Paris is testing out a new form of travel - an eco-friendly bubble-shaped taxi that zips along the water, capable of whisking passengers up and down the Seine River.

Paris is testing out a new form of travel: an eco-friendly bubble-shaped taxi that zips along the water up and down the Seine River.

Organizers are holding test runs this week on the white, oval-shaped electric hydrofoil boats that resemble tiny space shuttles gliding past Paris monuments.

They can fit four passengers, and if they get approved, can be ordered on an app like land taxis, shared bikes or other forms of transport.

Its designers hope to run the so-called Seabubbles commercially in Paris and other cities starting next year.

Proponents see the vehicle as a new model for the fast-changing landscape of urban mobility. Its designers claim it makes “zero sound, zero waves, zero carbon dioxide.”

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