Passengers subdue chaotic man on board Turkish Airlines jet | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World

Passengers subdue chaotic man on board Turkish Airlines jet

Associated Press
1298689_web1_1298689-f5de0d3121e8459db54f7b0c8c745894
AP
The scene as Associated Press photographer Hussein Malla observes as passengers and crew aboard a Turkish Airlines jetliner subdue a man who started screaming a few minutes after takeoff from Istanbul. Turkey, Friday June 14, 2019. The unidentified man began smashing at an oxygen mask box and damaged a cabin window, before pushing flight attendants aside and rushing toward the cockpit, but then calmed down and after about 2½ hours flying, the pilots announced that the plane was returning to Istanbul.
1298689_web1_1298689-bac3924fa54c4a0a8d4e9c70f27c2824
AP
The scene observed by Associated Press photographer Hussein Malla, as an unidentified passenger confronts plane crew members aboard a Turkish Airlines jetliner while in flight from Istanbul, Turkey, Friday June 14, 2019. The unidentified man had to be subdued when he began smashing at an oxygen mask box and damaged a cabin window, before pushing flight attendants aside and rushing toward the cockpit, but then calmed down and after about 2½ hours flying, the pilots announced that the plane was returning to Istanbul.
1298689_web1_1298689-923cf9c321ec471098d6421b1179bb38
AP
The scene observed by Associated Press photographer Hussein Malla as security, police and and officials remove a passenger from a Turkish Airlines jetliner after the passenger was subdued by passengers and crew following takeoff from Istanbul, Turkey, Friday June 14, 2019. The unidentified man began smashing at an oxygen mask box and damaged a cabin window, before pushing flight attendants aside and rushing toward the cockpit, but then he calmed down and after about 2½ hours flying, the pilots announced that the plane would return to Istanbul.

ANKARA, Turkey — Passengers on a Turkish Airlines jetliner flying to Sudan had to subdue a man who started screaming a few minutes after takeoff and began smashing an oxygen mask box and then a cabin window before pushing flight attendants aside and rushing toward the cockpit.

Associated Press photographer Hussein Malla was on the flight Friday and says several passengers stopped the man in the Boeing 737-900’s business class section. Flight attendants calmed the man down after about 15 minutes and he was taken back to a seat as the plane continued toward Khartoum. Flight attendants said the man was complaining about not being able to breathe.

After about 2½ hours, the pilots announced the plane was returning to Istanbul. A few minutes later, the man suddenly stood up and headed toward the front of the plane, where others grabbed him and tried to shackle him with plastic restraints provided by flight attendants but he resisted.

Passengers were yelling in fear and children were crying.

The plane landed back in Istanbul about three hours after it took off and police escorted the man off. As he departed, he shook hands with some passengers and kissed some children.

A Turkish Airlines official on Saturday confirmed Malla’s account, saying a 35-year-old Sudanese man on Flight TK680 from Istanbul to Khartoum displayed aggressive behavior, causing damage to the plane and physically and verbally harming other passengers.

He said the airline was forced to apply “inadmissible passenger” procedures to prevent further harm to passengers and ensure flight safety, which meant that the plane was diverted back to Istanbul and had to circle in the air to reduce fuel before landing.

It was not clear if the man, who was in police custody, was psychologically disturbed, the official said. He spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity in line with regulations.

He said the airline will decide later whether to file a legal complaint against the passenger.

Categories: News | World
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.