Police: Man broke into Taylor Swift’s home, took off shoes to be polite | TribLIVE.com
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Police: Man broke into Taylor Swift’s home, took off shoes to be polite

Associated Press
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AP
In this May 27, 2013 photo, people walk past a house owned by Taylor Swift in the village of Watch Hill in Westerly, R.I. Richard Joseph McEwan, of Milford, N.J., was arrested on Friday, Aug. 30, 2019, and charged with breaking into Swift’s Westerly, R.I., oceanfront house.
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AP
This booking photo released by the Westerly, R.I., Police Department shows Richard Joseph McEwan, of Milford, N.J., arrested on Friday, Aug. 30, 2019, and charged with breaking into Taylor Swift’s oceanfront house in Westerly.
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AP
In this Aug. 26, 2019 photo, Taylor Swift arrives at the MTV Video Music Awards in Newark, N.J. Richard Joseph McEwan, of Milford, N.J., was arrested on Friday, Aug. 30, and charged with breaking into Swift’s Westerly, R.I., oceanfront house.

WESTERLY, R.I. — Police say a man who broke into Taylor Swift’s beachfront mansion in Rhode Island took his shoes off because he wanted to be polite.

Westerly police who responded to the home just after 5 p.m. Friday found 26-year-old Richard Joseph McEwan inside.

Police Chief Shawn Lacey tells The Westerly Sun the Milford, New Jersey man wasn’t wearing shoes. When asked why, he said he was always taught to take his shoes off when entering someone’s home to be polite.

He’s charged with breaking and entering and willful trespassing. Online court records did not list a defense attorney.

Lacey says his officers have had to deal with several suspicious people at the singer’s home, but this is the first time he remembers someone making it inside.

He says no one was home.

Categories: AandE | Celebrity News | World
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