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Pompeo pledges continued pressure on Venezuela’s Maduro | TribLIVE.com
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Pompeo pledges continued pressure on Venezuela’s Maduro

Associated Press
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AP
Venezuelan migrants wait in line behind a vehicle for free food being handed out by Colombian residents near the Simon Bolivar International Bridge in La Parada, near Cucuta, Colombia, on the border with Venezuela, Sunday, Feb. 24, 2019. A U.S.-backed drive to deliver foreign aid to Venezuela on Saturday met strong resistance as troops loyal to President Nicolas Maduro blocked the convoys at the border and fired tear gas on protesters. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)
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AP
Demonstrators throw stones towards Venezuelan authorities, at the border between Brazil and Venezuela, Saturday, Feb.23, 2019. Tensions are running high in the Brazilian border city of Pacaraima. Thousands remained at the city’s international border crossing with Venezuela to demand the entry of food and medicine.(AP Photo/Ivan Valencia)
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AP
A protestor gets ready to hurl a burning tire during a protest at the border between Brazil and Venezuela, in Pacaraima, Roraima state, Brazil Saturday, Feb.23, 2019. Tensions are running high in the Brazilian border city of Pacaraima. Thousands remained at the city’s international border crossing with Venezuela to demand the entry of food and medicine.(AP Photo/Ivan Valencia)
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Demonstrators gather after clashing with the Bolivarian National Guard in Urena, Venezuela, near the border with Colombia, Saturday, Feb. 23, 2019. Venezuela’s National Guard fired tear gas on residents clearing a barricaded border bridge between Venezuela and Colombia on Saturday, heightening tensions over blocked humanitarian aid that opposition leader Juan Guaido has vowed to bring into the country over objections from President Nicolas Maduro. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

WASHINGTON — The United States will continue to pressure Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro until he understands his days are “numbered,” Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said on Sunday.

Pompeo’s comments came the day after clashes between activists trying to deliver U.S-backed humanitarian aid into Venezuela and troops loyal to Maduro. Two people were killed in a clash on the Brazilian border and some 300 injured in other violent clashes near Colombia.

Pompeo tells “Fox News Sunday” and CNN’s “State of the Union” that the Trump administration will continue to support opposition leader Juan Guaido. Pompeo declined to rule out U.S. military force as an option, but he added, “There’s more sanctions to be had, there’s more humanitarian assistance I think that we can provide.”

Maduro has blocked such aid at the border and resisted calls to step aside and let Guaido take power.

Pompeo says the U.S. will seek “other ways” to get food aid to Venezuelans.

Vice President Mike Pence travels to Bogota, Colombia, on Monday for an emergency meeting on Venezuela with foreign ministers from more than a dozen, mostly conservative Latin American and Caribbean states. Guaido said on Saturday he would meet with Pence in Bogota.

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