Pope allows ring-kissing after earlier pulling hand away | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World

Pope allows ring-kissing after earlier pulling hand away

Associated Press
940517_web1_940517-995410f301304b7e9faef0039c645e94
AP
85-year-old sister Maria Concetta Esu kisses the hand of Pope Francis as he presents her with a Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice award during his weekly general audience, in St. Peter’s Square, at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 27, 2019. 85-year-old sister Maria Concetta Esu is an obstetrician who gave birth to some 3,000 children during her 60 years of missions in Africa, that the pontiff met during his trip to the Central African Republic.
940517_web1_940517-1b37491f4e7c420c9c3e6a93ff14658d
AP
Pope Francis kisses a child as he arrives for his weekly general audience, in St. Peter’s Square, at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 27, 2019.
940517_web1_940517-3cbb7132219d44a38bd8ca93dedf195e
AP
Pope Francis arrives for his weekly general audience, in St. Peter’s Square, at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 27, 2019.
940517_web1_940517-630ac6bda150454ab4a4538087534a78
AP
Pope Francis presents 85-year-old sister Maria Concetta Esu with a Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice award during his weekly general audience, in St. Peter’s Square, at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 27, 2019. 85-year-old sister Maria Concetta Esu is an obstetrician who gave birth to some 3,000 children during her 60 years of missions in Africa, that the pontiff met during his trip to the Central African Republic.
940517_web1_940517-58553464d89044af83ecf7baa8c1f75c
AP
Pope Francis presents 85-year-old sister Maria Concetta Esu with a Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice award during his weekly general audience, in St. Peter’s Square, at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 27, 2019. 85-year-old sister Maria Concetta Esu is an obstetrician who gave birth to some 3,000 children during her 60 years of missions in Africa, that the pontiff met during his trip to the Central African Republic.
940517_web1_940517-59565200ad20491a9bbbe4fd23fb5546
AP
Pope Francis leaves at the end of his weekly general audience, in St. Peter’s Square, at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 27, 2019.

VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis allowed nuns and priests to kiss his papal ring during his weekly audience in St. Peter’s Square on Wednesday, two days after a video that showed him pulling his hand away from several faithful drew disapproval from some of the pope’s conservative critics.

Some conservative Catholics think Francis has abandoned church doctrine and saw his jerking his hand away from people who hoped to kiss his ring as evidence of him shunning age-old traditions.

But many Catholics noted that the short clip making the rounds online didn’t give a full picture.

During a visit Monday to Loreto, a major Italian pilgrimage site, Francis received a long line of faithful, some of whom shook his hand, while others kissed his hand or bowed down in a gesture of reverence. He only began pulling his hand away after having greeted a large number of people.

Those coming to his defense noted that he still had to greet sick people and lead a prayer during his visit.

The video clip also became material for comedians. Trevor Noah, host of American TV program “The Daily Show”, on Tuesday imitated Francis pulling his hand back and quipped, “I am impressed at how quick he is, like every single time.”

However, Francis allowed nuns and priests to kiss his hand during his general audience Wednesday.

One of them was Sister Maria Concetta Esu, an 85-year-old nun and obstetrician who has delivered around 3,000 babies as part of her missionary work over 60 years in the Central African Republic.

With Esu at his side gently helping the pontiff as his papers blew in the wind, Pope Francis recalled meeting her in Bangui in 2015 after she arrived in a canoe.

“This is a sign of our affection, and thanks for all the work you have done among our African sisters and brothers in the service of life, of children, of women and of families,” Francis said, presenting the nun with a medal. She then bowed and kissed his hand.

Among those commenting on Francis’ actions was Archbishop Mark Coleridge of Brisbane, who tweeted: “She kissed his ring!”

Each pope picks his own ring, which is destroyed at the end of his papacy, a formality meant to symbolize the end of his reign and to prevent forgeries. The papal Fisherman’s Ring was named for the apostle Peter, who was a fisherman and the first pope.

Francis’s version is gold-plated silver and depicts St. Peter holding the keys of the Holy See.

Categories: News | Top Stories | World
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.