Pride on display on 50th anniversary of Stonewall uprising | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World

Pride on display on 50th anniversary of Stonewall uprising

Associated Press
1350971_web1_1350971-4491dcc4c1424d7e9510158b14548cf7
AP
People gather near the Stonewall Inn Thursday, June 27, 2019, in New York. The original Stonewall Inn didn’t survive the 1969 police raid and riots that made it famous as a birthplace of the modern LGBTQ rights movement, but the current version will be a focal point of this week’s celebrations marking the uprising’s 50th anniversary.
1350971_web1_1350971-3f2b49aebe434ccc992c3d29080d6f52
AP
A pedestrian crosses Christopher Street Thursday, June 27, 2019, in New York. Two LGBT pride parades this Sunday, June 30, cap a month of events marking the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising, when patrons of a Greenwich Village gay bar fought back against a police raid and sparked a new era of gay activism and visibility.
1350971_web1_1350971-36b4935529394d4c944fb7fb3ed96263
AP
National Parks Rangers Anne Stanley, left, and J. Adams place flags around the Stonewall National Monument Thursday, June 27, 2019, in New York.
1350971_web1_1350971-f017ff636c424cbea37ff5d24534db86
AP
National Parks Ranger Anne Stanley places flags around the Stonewall National Monument, Thursday, June 27, 2019, in New York.

New York City is marking the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising, days of unrest in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village that began with a police raid on a gay bar and catalyzed a sustained LGTBQ liberation movement.

The streets outside the modern incarnation of the Stonewall Inn were blocked off Friday in preparation for a day of celebrations that include musical performances and an evening rally.

Sunday’s huge Pride parade — and an alternative march intended as a less corporate commemoration — also will swing past the bar and a tiny park outside. The park is at the center of the Stonewall National Monument.

Cities around the world also began celebrating Pride on Friday. Participants in a march in the Philippines went by the presidential palace in Manila, waving placards as they marked the 25th year since the first such gathering. Pittsburgh hosted events all throughout the month of June.

In 1969, the Stonewall Inn was part of a gay scene that was known, yet not open. At the time, showing same-sex affection or dressing in a way deemed gender-inappropriate could get people arrested, and bars had lost liquor licenses for serving LGBTQ customers.

The police raid on the bar began early the morning of June 28. It was unlicensed, and the officers had been assigned to stop any illegal alcohol sales.

Patrons and people who converged on the bar on Christopher Street resisted , hurling objects and at points scuffling with the officers.

Protests followed over several more days. A year later, gay New Yorkers marked the anniversary of the riot with the Christopher Street Liberation Day March. Thousands proudly paraded through a city where, at the time, LGBTQ people were largely expected to stay in the shadows.

The Stonewall Inn itself closed not long after the raid.

Since then, the space has been a bagel shop, a Chinese restaurant and other establishments, including a gay bar called Stonewall that briefly operated in the late 1980s.

The current Stonewall Inn dates to the early 1990s.

For years, its path was pitted with financial strains, business vagaries and loss. One co-owner, Jimmy Pisano, died three months before the Stonewall rebellion’s 25th anniversary in 1994.

Current owners Stacy Lentz and Kurt Kelly bought the business in 2006 and have sought to keep its legacy current.

“We understand we’re the innkeepers of history,” Lentz said. “We really feel like the fire that started at Stonewall in 1969 is not done. The battleground has just shifted.”

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.