Reagan statue being dedicated in Berlin to mark Wall fall | TribLIVE.com
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Reagan statue being dedicated in Berlin to mark Wall fall

Associated Press
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AP
Former U.S. President Ronald Reagan (center) uses a hammer and chisel Sept. 12, 1990, on the defunct Berlin Wall to take symbolic swings at the old Cold War barrier, three years after he called the Soviets to tear down the wall in Berlin.
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AP
From right: U.S. President Ronald Reagan, Berlin Mayor Eberhard Diepgen and West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl look over the Berlin Wall on June 12, 1987. The U.S. Embassy in Berlin is unveiling the statue of Reagan as a tribute to the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall.

BERLIN — The U.S. Embassy in Berlin was unveiling a statue of Ronald Reagan on Friday, on a site overlooking the location of the former president’s iconic speech imploring the Soviet Union to remove the Berlin Wall.

The larger-than-life statue is being installed atop the embassy’s terrace, at eye-level with the landmark Brandenburg Gate in downtown Berlin. U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo was the guest of honor.

Saturday marks the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall.

The gate, on the East German side of the Wall, was the backdrop for Reagan’s 1987 speech when he challenged Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev to go further with the reforms he was instituting.

Reagan implored him: “If you seek liberalization, come here to this gate. Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate. Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall.”

German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas drew domestic and international flak recently for failing to mention Reagan — or any other American — in an op-ed published in 26 European newspapers focused on the fall of the Berlin Wall and collapse of communism.

“Dear Minister Maas, on behalf of the late President Reagan, whom you don’t mention, and the millions of American Soldiers who served in West Germany along with your other NATO Allies, you’re welcome,” former U.S. Army Europe commander, retired Lt. Gen. Ben Hodges, wrote on Twitter.

Maas sought to defuse the criticism Thursday at an event with Pompeo, saying “we owe you our freedom and unity to a decisive degree,” while singling out contributions from Reagan and former President George H.W. Bush.

U.S. Ambassador Richard Grenell earlier this year opened a multimedia exhibit on the same terrace focusing on Reagan’s Brandenburg Gate speech, and said the statue was a tribute to a president whose “willingness to defend people seeking greater freedom around the world remains an inspiration today to Germans, Americans and every human being.”

“As a Californian, I’m personally proud to have our former governor and president of the United States standing atop the embassy, reminding visitors of America’s commitment to democracy and freedom,” he told the Associated Press.

Several American presidents visited Berlin during the Cold War to express their solidarity with those in the democratic West of the city that was divided by the Wall from Aug. 13, 1961, to Nov. 9, 1989.

Perhaps the best-known speech delivered by an American president came in 1963, when John F. Kennedy appeared at West Berlin’s city hall.

He told the thousands gathered: “All free men, wherever they may live, are citizens of Berlin, and, therefore, as a free man, I take pride in the words ‘Ich bin ein Berliner.’ ”

Today a plaque marks that location and the square has been renamed “John F. Kennedy Platz.”

The site of the Reagan speech is marked with an information sign, and the lawmaker who heads the state committee in charge of memorials in Berlin, Sabine Bangert, rejected the suggestion by some that Reagan had somehow been given short shrift.

“The contributions of U.S. Presidents John F. Kennedy and Ronald Reagan to Berlin as well as to German unity are well known in Berlin,” she told the AP.

“Kennedy’s … ‘Ich bin ein Berliner’ speech and Ronald Reagan’s memorable Berlin sentence from 1987, ‘Mr. Gorbachev tear down this wall,’ as well as Barack Obama’s speech at the Brandenburg Gate in 2016, are in all of our memories.”

Categories: World
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