Royal baby Archie christened at private Windsor ceremony | TribLIVE.com
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Royal baby Archie christened at private Windsor ceremony

Associated Press
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AP
This is an official christening photo released by the Duke and Duchess of Sussex on Saturday, July 6, 2019, showing Britain’s Prince Harry, right and Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex with their son Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor at Windsor Castle with with the Rose Garden in the background, in Windsor, England.
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AP
This is the official christening photo released by the Duke and Duchess of Sussex on Saturday, July 6, 2019, showing Britain’s Prince Harry, front row, second left and Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex with their son, Archie. Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall sits at left. Back row from left, Prince Charles, Doria Ragland, Lady Jane Fellowes, Lady Sarah McCorquodale, Prince William and Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, in the Green Drawing Room at Windsor Castle, Windsor, England.
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AP
A cake from a royal well-wisher in celebration of the royal christening of Archie, the son of Britain’s Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, outside Windsor Castle in England, Saturday, July 6, 2019. The 2-month-old son of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex will be baptized Saturday in a private chapel at the castle by Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, head of the Church of England.
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AP
Royal superfan John Loughrey, with company from Camilla the dog, prepares flags and posters in celebration of the royal christening of Archie, the son of Britain’s Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, outside Windsor Castle in England, Saturday, July 6, 2019. The 2-month-old son of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex will be baptized Saturday in a private chapel at the castle by Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, head of the Church of England.
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Visitors take pictures as the Changing of the Guard takes place, ahead of the royal christening of Archie, the son of Britain’s Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, outside Windsor Castle in England, Saturday, July 6, 2019. The 2-month-old son of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex will be baptized Saturday in a private chapel at the castle by Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, head of the Church of England.
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AP
Royal superfan John Loughrey holds a sign in celebration of the royal christening of Archie, the son of Britain’s Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, outside Windsor Castle in England, Saturday, July 6, 2019. The 2-month-old son of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex will be baptized Saturday in a private chapel at the castle by Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, head of the Church of England.

LONDON — The youngest member of Britain’s royal family, Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor, was christened at Windsor Castle on Saturday in a private ceremony — too private for some royal fans.

The 2-month-old son of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex was baptized in a private chapel at the castle west of London by Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, head of the Church of England.

Palace officials said that, in keeping with royal tradition, Archie wore a lace and satin christening gown — a replica of one made for Queen Victoria’s eldest daughter in 1841 — that was also used for his cousins Prince George, Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis.

He was sprinkled with water from the River Jordan at an ornate silver baptismal font that has been used in royal christenings for more than 150 years.

Archie, born May 6, is the first child of Prince Harry and the former Meghan Markle, and seventh in line to the British throne.

His parents released two photos taken by fashion photographer Chris Allerton, including a black-and-white image showing the couple cradling a tranquil Archie between them.

It was accompanied by a color portrait of the young family surrounded by relatives, including Harry’s brother Prince William and his wife Kate; Prince Charles and his wife Camilla; Meghan’s mother Doria Ragland; and Jane Fellowes and Sarah McCorquodale, the sisters of Harry’s late mother Princess Diana.

Archie’s great-grandmother Queen Elizabeth II did not attend the christening because of a prior engagement.

Meghan and Harry have faced criticism for declining to reveal the names of Archie’s godparents, and not giving the public a glimpse of the event — though that didn’t stop well-wishers coming to Windsor with Union Jack flags, banners and even a cake to mark the occasion.

The royal couple’s decision sparked controversy in part because of the recent revelation that their Windsor home was renovated with 2.4 million pounds ($3.06 million) of taxpayers’ money.

Royal fan Anne Daley, who brought a home-baked cake to Windsor, said she was “very hurt” by the decision.

“That baby is Princess Diana’s grandson. We should be able to see the christening,” she said.

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