Spruce planted in New York in 1959 becomes Rockefeller Center Christmas tree | TribLIVE.com
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Spruce planted in New York in 1959 becomes Rockefeller Center Christmas tree

Matt Rosenberg
1918803_web1_AP_19311635647978
Diane Bondareff/AP Images for Tishman Speyer
This year’s Rockefeller Center Christmas tree, a 77-foot tall Norway spruce, is craned onto a flatbed truck after being cut from the yard of Carol Schultz, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019, in Florida, N.Y.
1918803_web1_AP_19311593354405
Diane Bondareff/AP Images for Tishman Speyer
This year’s Rockefeller Center Christmas tree, a 77-foot tall Norway spruce, is craned onto a flatbed truck after being cut from the yard of Carol Schultz, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019, in Florida, N.Y.
1918803_web1_AP_19311593354510
Diane Bondareff/AP Images for Tishman Speyer
This year’s Rockefeller Center Christmas tree, a 77-foot tall is craned onto a flatbed truck after being cut from the yard of Carol Schultz, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019, in Florida, N.Y.
1918803_web1_AP_19311593342407
Diane Bondareff/AP Images for Tishman Speyer
Workers prepare to cut down a 77-foot tall Norway Spruce that will serve as this year’s Rockefeller Center Christmas tree, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019, in Florida, N.Y.
1918803_web1_AP_19311593332090
Diane Bondareff/AP Images for Tishman Speyer
Students from local elementary schools cheer as this year’s Rockefeller Center Christmas tree, a 77-foot tall Norway Spruce, is cut, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019, in Florida, N.Y.
1918803_web1_AP_19311593342088
Diane Bondareff/AP Images for Tishman Speyer
Local residents watch as this year’s Rockefeller Center Christmas tree, a 77-foot tall Norway Spruce, is cut, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019, in Florida, N.Y.
1918803_web1_AP_19311593292443
Diane Bondareff/AP Images for Tishman Speyer
Carol Schultz hugs the trunk of her 77-foot tall Norway Spruce that she donated to serve as this year’s Rockefeller Center Christmas tree, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019, in Florida, N.Y.
1918803_web1_AP_19311593291221
Diane Bondareff/AP Images for Tishman Speyer
Workers prepare to cut down a 77-foot tall Norway Spruce that will serve as this year’s Rockefeller Center Christmas tree, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019, in Florida, N.Y.

Carol Schultz of Florida, N.Y., planted a 4 foot Norway spruce in her yard in spring 1959.

She wasn’t sure it would survive.

Sixty years later, she watched as the tree was cut down in her yard, lifted by a crane and hauled to New York City, where it will be set up as the Christmas tree in Rockefeller Center this season.

“I said, ‘Oh I don’t think it’s gonna take.’ You know how things happen, but it turned out to be a magnificent tree,” Schultz said. “It’s so beautiful, shaped perfect and I’m happy to share it with everybody.”

The 14-ton tree is the 88th Christmas tree in Rockefeller Center.

The tree lighting in New York is scheduled for Dec. 4.

Matt Rosenberg is a Tribune-Review assistant multimedia editor. You can contact Matt at 412-320-7937, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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