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‘Time for us to live for him’: Slain Colorado student remembered | TribLIVE.com
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‘Time for us to live for him’: Slain Colorado student remembered

Associated Press
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Associated Press
More than 600 Jeeps lead a caravan Wednesday to the memorial service for Kendrick Castillo, who was killed in the assault on the STEM Highlands Ranch School, in Highlands Ranch, Colo.
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Associated Press
A photograph of student Kendrick Castillo stands Tuesday amid a display of tributes outside the STEM School Highlands Ranch a week after the attack on the school that left Castillo dead and others injured in Highlands Ranch, Colo.
1163305_web1_1163305-6798c5f714f74765b53307d5053dbe61
Associated Press
A display grows Tuesday outside the STEM School Highlands Ranch a week after the attack on the school that left one student dead and others injured in Highlands Ranch, Colo. Student Kendrick Castillo pictured in the display was was fatally wounded in the May 7 shooting.
1163305_web1_1163305-2dbc48f166d248d3bffe2b22ed69a44e
Associated Press
The display grows Tuesday outside the STEM School Highlands Ranch a week after the attack on the school that left one student dead and others injured in Highlands Ranch, Colo.
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Joe Amon | The Denver Post via AP
Devon Erickson appears in court at the Douglas County Courthouse on Wednesday in Castle Rock, Colo. Erickson is one of two students suspected of shooting several classmates in their Colorado charter school.

HIGHLANDS RANCH, Colo. — Nearly 2,000 people turned out Wednesday for a memorial service to honor the Colorado teenager who was killed while charging one of the two gunmen who opened fire inside a high school and shot nine people just days before graduation.

A line of Jeeps and trucks stretched along a Highlands Ranch roadway ahead of the service for Kendrick Castillo, 18, who was a Jeep and off-road vehicle enthusiast. His casket was draped with yellow and blue flowers that represented the colors of the STEM School Highlands Ranch, and the stage of the church where the service was held was adorned with symbols of his passion for science, the outdoors and his faith.

His father, John Castillo, said it was no surprise to him and his wife, Maria, that their son acted as he did on May 7, when he and two classmates disarmed one of the suspects. He urged those in attendance to be more like his son and put love and compassion for others first.

“We love our community,” Castillo said. “We’re a family of three and a little dog, but you know, I feel the love of thousands.”

Speaker after speaker praised the young man, focusing on his character and the accomplishments of his short life. References to the shooting were few, including one by Dakota Mann, who was on the school robotics team with Castillo.

“He died for us. Now it’s time for us to live for him,” Mann said.

Castillo and classmates Brendan Bialy and Joshua Jones were credited with helping minimize the bloodshed by charging at one of the suspects in a classroom.

According to Bialy, Castillo sprang into action against the shooter “and immediately was on top of him with complete disregard for his own safety.” Jones said he was shot twice in the leg during the ordeal. Bialy said he was able to take the attacker’s weapon.

Jones, 18, said Tuesday that he is recovering quickly from his wounds, but said emotionally he’s “still in a bit of a funk.”

All of the wounded students have been released from hospitals.

The shooting happened nearly three weeks after the neighboring town of Littleton marked the 20th anniversary of the Columbine High School attack that killed 13 people. The two schools are separated by about seven miles south of Denver.

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