Tornado slams Dallas; 4 killed in Arkansas, Oklahoma | TribLIVE.com
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Tornado slams Dallas; 4 killed in Arkansas, Oklahoma

Associated Press
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AP
In this Sunday, Oct. 20, 2019 photo, Henry Ramirez, a member of Primera Iglesia Dallas, is consoled by his mother Maribel Morales as they survey severe damage to the church, where Ramirez plays drums and Morales attends, after a tornado tore through North Dallas.
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AP
In this Sunday, Oct. 20, 2019 photo, Matt Younger, right, a pastor at Northway Church, embraces facilities associate Robert Lusk in their church’s severely damaged sanctuary after a tornado tore through North Dallas.
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@AthenaRising via AP
This Oct. 20, 2019 image made from video by Twitter user @AthenaRising shows the tornado in Rockwall, TX. The National Weather Service confirmed a tornado touched down in Dallas on Sunday night, causing structural damage and knocking out electricity to thousands.
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AP
In this Sunday, Oct. 20, 2019 photo, Maribel Morales, a member of Primera Iglesia Dallas, is consoled by fellow church member Ashley Villalobos as she surveys severe damage to the church, which sits near Walnut Hill and Marsh Lane, after a tornado tore through North Dallas.
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AP
In this Sunday, Oct. 20, 2019 photo, the main sanctuary of Northway Church shows severe structural damage caused by a tornado that tore through North Dallas.
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Lew Morris via AP
In this Sunday, Oct. 20, 2019, photo offered by Lew Morris, damage to the KNON-FM radio station studio that hosts “Reckless Rock Radio” is seen after a tornado touched down in Dallas, Texas. The National Weather Service confirmed a tornado touched down in Dallas on Sunday night, causing structural damage and knocking out electricity to thousands.

DALLAS — A tornado tossed trees into homes, tore off storefronts and downed power lines but killed no one in a densely populated area of Dallas, leaving Mayor Eric Johnson to declare the city “very fortunate” to be assessing only property damage.

A meteorologist said people took shelter thanks to early alerts, and that it was fortunate the tornado struck Sunday evening, when many people were home.

“Anytime you have a tornado in a major metropolitan area, the potential for large loss of life is always there,” said Patrick Marsh, the warning coordination meteorologist at NOAA’s Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Okla. “We were very fortunate that the tornado did not hit the Dallas Cowboys’ stadium or the State Fair, where you would have had a lot of people that were exposed.”

The tornado crossed over two major interstates. “If that happened at rush hour, I think we’d be talking about a different story,” he said.

The National Weather Service said the tornado that ripped through North Dallas was an EF-3, which has a maximum wind speed of 140 mph. The agency said another tornado in the suburb of Rowlett was EF-1, with maximum wind speeds of 100 mph.

The late-night storms caused chaos in several states and killed at least four people in Arkansas and Oklahoma. The Storm Prediction Center said severe thunderstorms could continue through Monday night along the Gulf Coast from southeast Louisiana to the Florida Panhandle, with damaging winds and a couple of tornadoes possible.

In one Dallas neighborhood, Dustin and Lauren Collins said they felt lucky as they cleared debris from the yard of their largely intact home.

“When other people’s homes are in your front yard, you just realize — just the magnitude of the storm,” said Lauren Collins, 36.

Dustin Collins, 37, said he gathered his family together after receiving the tornado alert. They climbed into the bathtub and pulled a mattress over top, huddling there with their 8-month-old son.

“We just sat in the bathtub and sang songs, trying to keep everyone calm,” Lauren Collins said.

Several stores were destroyed at a nearby shopping center, with large parts of the roof gone and only a mess of debris left inside.

Nearby, Georges Benamou said he was in his bedroom when a tree branch fell through the flat roof of his single-story home and into the living room.

“I heard some crack, crack, crack, and then I heard some trees falling on top of the roof,” he said.

Brent Huddleston, 43, said he sheltered with his 9- and 11-year-old children in a closet as the house shook around them. They later found parts of street and shopping center signs that had been blown into their yard.

“It hit really fast,” he said.

Dallas Fire-Rescue spokesman Jason Evans said no firefighters were hurt when the storm made the roof of Station 41 collapse.

Tornadoes are not common in October, and cities are rarely hit because they don’t have a big footprint in the tornado belt, according to tornado scientist Harold Brooks of the National Severe Storms Laboratory.

It’s like “randomly throwing darts,” Brooks said.

A study by Brooks last year found that only one-third of the most violent tornadoes hit communities of more than 5,000 people.

The storm system disrupted flights in the Dallas area, northwest Arkansas and at Memphis International Airport in Tennessee, where windows were broken.

One person died when a tree fell on a home in Rogers, Arkansas, about 150 miles northwest of Little Rock, according to the Benton County Department of Public Safety. In northeastern Arkansas, an EF-1 tornado injured at least five people in Tyronza.

Authorities said severe thunderstorms were responsible for the deaths of at least three people in eastern Oklahoma.

Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation spokeswoman Brooke Arbeitman said two teenage boys died of carbon monoxide poisoning late Sunday in Weleetka, about 80 miles east of Oklahoma City. She said the 14- and 15-year-old boys were using a portable gas generator in a travel trailer after the storms knocked out power. The father of the younger boy discovered their bodies Monday morning.

Another person died late Sunday night when a tree blew onto a mobile home near Valliant, about 170 miles southeast of Oklahoma City, emergency management officials said.

About 46,000 electric customers were without power in Dallas and another 19,000 in the surrounding area, said Oncor spokeswoman Connie Piloto. It could take days to restore service.

In Memphis, the storm ripped down several large trees that blocked roads in residential neighborhoods. An apartment complex and car dealerships and other businesses suffered damage, but no injuries or deaths were reported.

Categories: News | World
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