Trump aide Kellyanne Conway asks reporter, ‘What’s your ethnicity?’ | TribLIVE.com
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Trump aide Kellyanne Conway asks reporter, ‘What’s your ethnicity?’

Associated Press
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Getty Images
White House Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway talks to reporters outside of the West Wing on July 16, 2019 in Washington. Conway defended President Trump’s weekend remarks on Twitter, writing that four Democratic congresswomen of color to go back to their own countries.
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AP
Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway speaks with reporters at the White House, Tuesday, July 16, 2019, in Washington.
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AP
Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway speaks with reporters at the White House, Tuesday, July 16, 2019, in Washington.

NEW YORK — White House adviser Kellyanne Conway says she meant no disrespect in asking a reporter to reveal his ethnicity.

Her question came during an informal press gathering Tuesday when reporter Andrew Feinberg asked her about President Trump’s tweets regarding freshmen Democratic congresswomen Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Rashida Tlaib, Ayanna Pressley and Ilhan Omar. Feinberg wondered what countries Trump was referring to when he suggested the American politicians should return to their countries of origin.

Conway replied, “What’s your ethnicity?”

After a brief pause, Feinberg asked why that was relevant to his question.

Conway, who said she is of Italian and Irish descent, tweeted later that she was trying to make the point that “We are all from somewhere else ‘originally.’”

Feinberg works for the technology publication Breakfast Media.

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