ShareThis Page
White House manages expectations for second Kim summit | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World

White House manages expectations for second Kim summit

Associated Press
| Sunday, February 24, 2019 10:45 a.m
795357_web1_795357-116f9f02e74d43b39c9e6f06565723c3
AP
In this June 12, 2018, photo, U.S. President Donald Trump stands with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during a meeting on Sentosa Island, in Singapore. For some observers, the nightmare result of the second summit between Trump and Kim is an ill-considered deal that allows North Korea to get everything it wants while giving up very little, even as the mercurial leaders trumpet a blockbuster nuclear success.
795357_web1_795357-0e1d944820fc431694ea1db2f688c024
AP
Vietnamese soldiers watch from a top of a building neighboring Government Guesthouse and the Metropole hotel next to a poster featuring upcoming summit between the U.S. and North Korea in Hanoi, Vietnam, Sunday, Feb. 24, 2019. The second summit between U.S President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un will take place in Hanoi on Feb. 27 and 28.

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump is trying to manage expectations for his second summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, predicting a “continuation of the progress” made last time.

Trump tweeted Sunday that he was leaving early the next day for the meeting in Hanoi, Vietnam, adding a tantalizing nod to “Denuclearization?” He also said Kim knows that “without nuclear weapons, his country could fast become one of the great economic powers anywhere in the World.”

Their first meeting, in Singapore in June, produced a vaguely worded commitment from North Korea to dismantle its nuclear weapons program. Heading into this week’s summit, Trump has said that North Korea has not tested any nuclear weapons in months and that as long as that testing has ceased, he’s in no rush.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said on “Fox News Sunday” that he was hoping for a “substantive step forward.” But, he cautioned, ‘it may not happen, but I hope that it will.”

“President Trump has also said this is going to take time. There may have to be another summit. We may not get everything done this week,” Pompeo said.

Pompeo said he hoped to put a “road map” in place, but would not discuss the possibility of declaring a formal end to the Korean War or pulling some American troops from South Korea, in keeping with his stand against publicly discussing issue that could arise during the negotiations.

Pompeo said he believes North Korea remains a nuclear threat, though Trump tweeted after the Singapore summit that “there is no longer a Nuclear Threat from North Korea.”

Pompeo told CNN’s “State of the Union” that the commitment Kim made “had substantially taken down the risk to the American people.”

Categories: News | Top Stories | World
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.